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zerosniper123

I'm completely lost...can someone show me the steps on how to solve these... A force of 750 pounds compresses a spring 3 inches from its natural length of 15 inches. Find the work done in compressing the spring an additional 3 inches.

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. nubeer
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    work done force * distance.

    • one year ago
  2. nubeer
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    lol forgot that equal after work done.. *work done =force * perpendicular distance.

    • one year ago
  3. zerosniper123
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    Okay well can you help me start up the equation because I'm completely lost...:O

    • one year ago
  4. nubeer
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    it has told u 750 is the force which is not going to cahnge .. so now u just have to find the distance the spring is going to compressed.

    • one year ago
  5. amistre64
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    |dw:1363361078018:dw|

    • one year ago
  6. amistre64
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    which is prolly redundant information, we already know the force and the distance that it moved.

    • one year ago
  7. amistre64
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    .... an additional 3 inches eh we would need to recalculate the Force then right?

    • one year ago
  8. amistre64
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    \[750=-k(3)\] \[\frac{750}{3}=-k\] \[F_{new}=\frac{750}{3}(3+3)\]right?

    • one year ago
  9. amistre64
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    since the force to move the spring varies across its distance, we could use integration to determine the total amount of work done .... if you believe that the question is asking for a more complicated result

    • one year ago
  10. amistre64
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    \[W=\int Fxd\] \[W=\int_a^b(-kx)x~dx\] \[W=\int_{3}^{6}\frac{750}{3}x^2~dx\] \[W=\frac{750}{9}(6^3-3^3)\]

    • one year ago
  11. zerosniper123
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    Okay and that is the work done :) Thanks man! :D

    • one year ago
  12. zerosniper123
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    Why is W= 750/9 shouldnt it be 750/3?

    • one year ago
  13. zerosniper123
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    then times by (6^3-3^3)

    • one year ago
  14. amistre64
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    no, you are prolly not familiar with integration if you ask that question

    • one year ago
  15. zerosniper123
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    Okay...What exactly are the units?

    • one year ago
  16. amistre64
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    in effect: to integrate a variable, you want to increase the exponent by 1, and divide by the new exponent \[\int~x\ dx=\frac{x^2}{2}\]

    • one year ago
  17. zerosniper123
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    Ohhh okay thanks. :)

    • one year ago
  18. amistre64
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    the units will still be pounds per inches

    • one year ago
  19. amistre64
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    pounds per square inches that is

    • one year ago
  20. zerosniper123
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    Okay thanks man! :D

    • one year ago
  21. zerosniper123
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    So 15,750 pounds per square in.

    • one year ago
  22. amistre64
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    Force over a Distance .... nah, its just pounds per inch you might want to make it more presentable tho and convert it to Newtons of something

    • one year ago
  23. zerosniper123
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    Okay so how would I change it to N ewtons?

    • one year ago
  24. amistre64
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    conversions arent in my memory .... might have to google a conversion :)

    • one year ago
  25. zerosniper123
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    Okay thanks anyways! :D

    • one year ago
  26. amistre64
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    Work is normally expressed in Newtons per meter

    • one year ago
  27. amistre64
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    so newtons to pounds and inches to meters would be the conversion

    • one year ago
  28. zerosniper123
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    Yeah it gave me this 2758247.65125 per Newton Meter

    • one year ago
  29. zerosniper123
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    http://www.convertunits.com/from/pounds+per+inch/to/newton/metre

    • one year ago
  30. zerosniper123
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    Thats the website I used to convert.

    • one year ago
  31. amistre64
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    \[\frac{1575lbs*in}{1}\frac{.0254m}{1in}*\frac{4.448N}{1lbs}=177.94~Nm\]

    • one year ago
  32. amistre64
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    my mistake was in the lbs/in,,, its lbs x inches

    • one year ago
  33. zerosniper123
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    Okay so its x not *

    • one year ago
  34. amistre64
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    more like: \[\cancel{\frac{1575~lbs}{1in}}\to1575~lbs~in\] "per" is divisiion and we didnt divide .. we multiplied

    • one year ago
  35. amistre64
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    lol .... and i seemed to have dropped a 0 on the end, 15750

    • one year ago
  36. zerosniper123
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    Haha okay thanks :)

    • one year ago
  37. zerosniper123
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    So the answer is 17,794.2Nm ;D

    • one year ago
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