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Research and provide a brief history of the Pythagorean Theorem (1–2 paragraphs). Be sure to site the sources of information you used. There are many different proofs of the Pythagorean Theorem. Research and choose three different proofs. Outline and provide an explanation for each. Be sure to site the sources of information you used. . If you had to prove the Pythagorean Theorem to another person, which proof would you use? Why

Mathematics
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My favorite proof is the rectangle one. It's simple and elegant. I don't approve of doing homework for people, so I'm gonna leave you with that idea and let you look it up.
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The one you just drew, what proof would it be?

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Other answers:

That's one step of the rectangle proof.
I see
Thank you both :)
You're welcome! If you want a starting place to look for history, I would suggest looking into Pythagora's school.
Thanks I will, I'm also Googling the rectangle proof right now, they have it for dummies.lol
I just want to get it finished already :)
take a look at this http://www.math.ubc.ca/~cass/courses/m446-03/pl322/pl322.html theorem was known by the Babylonian centuries before pythagoras
ok I will, Thanks satellit73
Wonderful. Also, if you find the Pythagorean Theorem particularly interesting, I would suggest Simon Singh's book, Fermat's Enigma. It's about Fermat's Last Theorem, which went unproved for over 300 years. It's a variation of the Pythagorean Theorem, only it deals with exponents over two. For example, a^3+b^3=c^3. Fermat said there were no solutions. However, he did not write down his proof, so we couldn't be sure he was correct. Anyway, it's a very interesting book by one of my favorite mathematicians.
Satellite, the Babylonians knew about it, but couldn't prove it. A student at Pythagora's school was the first to write a proof.
Have you tried wikipedia?
There's always stuff on Wikipedia, but people come here for help from real people (not saying wiki writers aren't real) that can explain things in steps with extra information. Different people explain in different ways, which is important. Sometimes, the teacher's explanation or the wiki's explanation doesn't click, so they come to us.
I'll try anything
It is a good place to start :)
Oh, I just thought of this. There are actually two rectangle proofs. One is the proof by rearrangement and the other is Euclidian proof. Both involve rectangles.
There are more proofs of this theorem than any other.

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