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Grazes

  • one year ago

Check my math.

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  1. Grazes
    • one year ago
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    1. \[\cos (\cos^{-1} \frac{ 1 }{ 2 })=\frac{ 1 }{ 2 }\]

  2. funinabox
    • one year ago
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    cos and cos-1 are inverses of each other. inverses cancel out. so yes 1 is correct

  3. Grazes
    • one year ago
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    2.\[\cos (\cos^{-1} 2)=2 \]

  4. funinabox
    • one year ago
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    same reasoning as 1. inverses cancel out...

  5. Grazes
    • one year ago
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    But I recall that my teacher told me that this is not the case in certain circumstances.

  6. funinabox
    • one year ago
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    that doesn't really make sense. in all circumstances, an equation and it's inverse will cancel. it is a property of inverse equations.

  7. Grazes
    • one year ago
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    I'll ask him tomorrow.

  8. funinabox
    • one year ago
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    unless he was referring to restricting domain and range. in order to create an inverse, it must pass the horizontal line test. that means for every x, there is a unique f(x). in this sense, equations and there inverses are different.

  9. funinabox
    • one year ago
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    the very defining feature of an inverse is (x,y) equals (y,x) in it's inverse. therefore, they will always cancel.

  10. ZeHanz
    • one year ago
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    cos^-1(2) is undefined, so cos(cos^-1(2)) is also undefined.

  11. funinabox
    • one year ago
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    http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=cos%28arccos%282%29 doesn't matter @ZeHanz the cos and it's inverse cancel out before you even do anything. imagine they aren't even there, basically.

  12. wio
    • one year ago
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    \[ \cos^{-1}:[-1,1]\mapsto [0,\pi]\\ \sin^{-1}:[-1,1]\mapsto [-\pi/2,\pi/2] \]

  13. ZeHanz
    • one year ago
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    No that's not true. See image attached. You cannot calculate the inverse cosine of 2, which is what you would have to do here. WolframAlpha can do it, because they use complex numbers, not real numbers.

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  14. funinabox
    • one year ago
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    you don't have to calculate arccos of 2. is my entire reasoning here.

  15. ZeHanz
    • one year ago
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    So the reason they would cancel is not that they do beforehand, but it is because you CAN calculate the inverse cosine of 2, when complex numbers (imaginary or real) are allowed. If that is the case, there is nothing wrong.

  16. ZeHanz
    • one year ago
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    See what I mean: http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=arccos+2+ I rest my case.

  17. funinabox
    • one year ago
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    woops yeah i was definitely wrong about that part i blame it on st paddy day stupor

  18. ZeHanz
    • one year ago
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    WA works with complex numbers as a default. Many people don't.

  19. ZeHanz
    • one year ago
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    How to calculate \(\cos^{-1}2?\) Solve \(\cos z=2\). Now \(\cos z=\dfrac{e^{iz}+e^{-iz}}{2}=2\), so \(e^{iz}+e^{-iz}=4\). Multiply with \(e^{iz}\): \((e^{iz})^2+1=4e^{iz} \Leftrightarrow (e^{iz})^2-4e^{iz}+1=0\) Solve it with the Quadratic Formula: \(e^{iz}=\dfrac{4 \pm \sqrt{16-4}}{2}=2\pm\sqrt{3}\). \(iz=\ln(2\pm\sqrt{3})\), so \(z=\frac{1}{i}\ln(2\pm\sqrt{3})=-i\ln(2\pm\sqrt{3})\). One of these simplifies to 1.316957897i, just as the solution of WA.

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