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Dr.Professor

  • 3 years ago

A super MATH riddle! You can place weights on both side of weighing balance and you need to measure all weights between 1 and 1000. For example if you have weights 1 and 3,now you can measure 1,3 and 4 like earlier case, and also you can measure 2,by placing 3 on one side and 1 on the side which contain the substance to be weighed. So question again is how many minimum weights and of what denominations you need to measure all weights from 1kg to 1000kg.

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  1. Dr.Professor
    • 3 years ago
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    Here is the first, @theawesome

  2. Dr.Professor
    • 3 years ago
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    Sir, please try it!

  3. Dr.Professor
    • 3 years ago
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    Please try it.

  4. Dr.Professor
    • 3 years ago
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    @nubeer

  5. NumbersCantLIE
    • 3 years ago
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    I give up. Cant do it!

  6. theawesome
    • 3 years ago
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    what earlier case?

  7. tkhunny
    • 3 years ago
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    Each weight has three possible states: 1) On the left 2) On the right 3) Off the scale Please consider powers of 3 as a complete solution.

  8. mathslover
    • 3 years ago
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    1, 3, 9, 27, 81, 243, 729 , GP... ? right?

  9. tkhunny
    • 3 years ago
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    729+243+81 > 1000 -- I think you have it.

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