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JohnnyCowCow

  • 3 years ago

When a coin is flipped, there are two possible outcomes: heads or tails. If a coin is flipped three times, what is the probability that there will be tails all three times?

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  1. JohnnyCowCow
    • 3 years ago
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    I can post the possible answers if necessary

  2. wio
    • 3 years ago
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    Don't post possible answers.

  3. JohnnyCowCow
    • 3 years ago
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    OK

  4. kropot72
    • 3 years ago
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    The 3 flips are independent trials each with a probability of 1/2 for tails. Probability of 3 tails in a row is \[\frac{1}{2}\times \frac{1}{2}\times \frac{1}{2}=you\ can\ calculate\]

  5. mathstudent55
    • 3 years ago
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    Figure it out yourself the same we did the previous question. Write a table with all possible outcomes. Then see what fraction your desired outcome is of the total number of outcomes.

  6. JohnnyCowCow
    • 3 years ago
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    0.125

  7. JohnnyCowCow
    • 3 years ago
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    Thanks!

  8. kropot72
    • 3 years ago
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    You're welcome :)

  9. mathstudent55
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1364251372872:dw| There are 8 possible outcomes, and only 1 is three tails, so the probabilty of three tails is 1/8

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