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hogie

  • 3 years ago

Simplifying radical expressions.

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  1. hogie
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\sqrt{4a^2}\]

  2. hogie
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1366344988992:dw|

  3. hogie
    • 3 years ago
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    What do i do with the a^2

  4. hogie
    • 3 years ago
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    ?

  5. hogie
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1366345074437:dw|

  6. dave0616
    • 3 years ago
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    a is squared, and the opposite of a square root is to the second power. because this expression can also be written as (4a^2)^1/2. so if you take 2 and multiply it by a half, you get 1. so the answer is 2a

  7. hogie
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1366345329452:dw|

  8. dave0616
    • 3 years ago
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    same principle is used. (4x^4)^1/2, 4*(1/2)=2= 2x^2

  9. hogie
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1366345558930:dw|

  10. dave0616
    • 3 years ago
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    correct

  11. hogie
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1366345964027:dw|

  12. dave0616
    • 3 years ago
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    i wanna help you through this one. what is x*x*x*x?

  13. hogie
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1366346145214:dw|

  14. hogie
    • 3 years ago
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    you can only pull two x's out right?

  15. dave0616
    • 3 years ago
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    that is correct. so now you have sqrt(x^4). well in a way yes, but lets go ahead and use the formula we had.: (x^4)^1/2 4*(1/2)=2

  16. dave0616
    • 3 years ago
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    so you have x^2

  17. hogie
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1366346262015:dw|

  18. hogie
    • 3 years ago
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    That would be the answer? ^^^

  19. dave0616
    • 3 years ago
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    nope, because you origonally had :\[\sqrt{x^{4}}\] and you took the square root of that to get x^2

  20. hogie
    • 3 years ago
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    So what would it be? Just x^2

  21. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
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    \(\large \sqrt{9x^4}= 3x^2\) is correct.

  22. dave0616
    • 3 years ago
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    @hartnn and @hogie i guess i am confused as to where the sqrt(9x^4) came from, because i dont see that any where, thought 3x^2 would be correct for that

  23. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1366347228041:dw|

  24. dave0616
    • 3 years ago
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    ohhhh i mistook that as a four, im sorry, then yes 3x^2 would be correct

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