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Caio

  • 3 years ago

1C-2 Why do I have to use f(x) - f(a) over x - a on the difference quotient ?

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  1. robertehoward
    • 3 years ago
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    The difference quotient is about change in height(y) over the change in width(x). If x-a is the difference in width of a function, the difference in height would be f(x)-(a). If you're using \[\Delta x\] as the change in width then you want\[f(x+\Delta x) - f(x)\] to represent the change in height. If you're h as the change in width then you would f(x+h)-f(x) as the change in height, all 3 forms are the same way of saying the change in height over the change in width, which is called the slope. The difference quotient is about finding the instantaneous slope, that is when the limit of the change in width approaches zero.

  2. Caio
    • 3 years ago
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    Ok I get it now, thank you

  3. EulersEquation
    • 2 years ago
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    This is just another way of finding the slope: the change in y divided by the change in x: (y2-y1)/(x2-x1)

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