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UnkleRhaukus

  • one year ago

Is electric current a scalar? Can it be negative?

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  1. .Sam.
    • one year ago
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    THAT is what I thought also

  2. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    i got it wrong, i dont really understand why

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  3. .Sam.
    • one year ago
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    Aw

  4. DLS
    • one year ago
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    Current is scalar and it cannot be negative.

  5. DLS
    • one year ago
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    \[\LARGE I= - \frac{dQ}{dt}\] indicates that flow of current per unit time is decreasing maybe the question posted is a subpart of another question or perhaps incomplete.

  6. DLS
    • one year ago
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    @yrelhan4 ? :O

  7. yrelhan4
    • one year ago
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    the convention that we follow is movement of -ve charge as current right?

  8. raane
    • one year ago
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    @DLS current can be negative

  9. Shadowys
    • one year ago
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    normally we don't take current as a vector and instead use the length vector instead.

  10. raane
    • one year ago
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    because its scalar

  11. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1367418867689:dw|

  12. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    if i assume that way is +ve, then the reverse of it will be -ve. in a circuit we assume current directions initially. based on that we get -ve or +ve numbers after analysis

  13. Ruchi.
    • one year ago
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    becoz current does'nt follow vector algebra so, it is scalar.

  14. agent0smith
    • one year ago
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    "the convention that we follow is movement of -ve charge as current right?" I think this is why. Current is created by flow of electrons which go from - to +, but current is defined as + to -.

  15. agent0smith
    • one year ago
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    Still, this site uses no negative sign, it has your answer... http://physics.tutorvista.com/electricity-and-magnetism/electric-current.html

  16. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    maybe electric current is a phasor

  17. agent0smith
    • one year ago
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    Hmm, i guess current can be negative, because it does have direction (it can come up like that when using Kirchoff's laws, to find current in loops of a circuit).

  18. yrelhan4
    • one year ago
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    http://openstudy.com/study#/updates/4fb98da9e4b05565342e8394 Look what phoneix_rags and chrsimmo have said.. hmm.. scalar i'd say now..

  19. yrelhan4
    • one year ago
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    and why it is not a vector even though it has direction... i'll give it to ruchi.. still not 100% sure about what current is.. but scalar looks good to me.

  20. yrelhan4
    • one year ago
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    ok another example.. for force on a current carrying wire in a magnetic field F=IdL×B .. here B is a vector.. and dL is a vector. we take the the direction of current to decide the direction of dL.. and it completely depends on what coordinate system we choose.

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