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Naveen

  • 3 years ago

There's a question asking me how many 2/3 fit into 6. I don't even know where to begin. Can someone help?

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  1. Gretacig
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\frac{ 2 }{ 3 } \times x=6\] \[x=\frac{ 6\times3 }{ 2 }=\frac{ 18 }{2 }=9\]

  2. Naveen
    • 3 years ago
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    Wow. I never thought of doing that. Thanks. This is reallyhelpful.

  3. Gretacig
    • 3 years ago
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    no problem :)

  4. Naveen
    • 3 years ago
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    Are you in college? You seem very smart.

  5. Gretacig
    • 3 years ago
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    I am in university :)

  6. nubeer
    • 3 years ago
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    that's cool.. :)

  7. cthomasknight
    • 2 years ago
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    Why are you allowed to move the x to the other side? How come there's a 2 on the bottom now?

  8. NLCircle
    • 2 years ago
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    @cthomasknight, the easy way to remember what to do is to keep in mind that 'dividing by a fraction is the same as multiplying by the inverse of the fraction'. That's what Gretacig does in her response: 2/3 * x = 6 but you need an equation with a shape like x = .... This can only be achieved by dividing left and right by 2/3. Now apply the rule above, about multiplying by the inverse of the fraction (so dividing by 2/3 is multiplying by 3/2). 2/3 * 2/3 * x = 3/2 * 6, where 3/2 * 2/3 = 1, leading to 1*x = 2/3 * 6 ==> x = 18

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