Quantcast

A community for students. Sign up today!

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

ValentinaT

  • one year ago

Help please? With steps?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. ValentinaT
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    1 Attachment
  2. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    How far did you get with this?

  3. ValentinaT
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Hold on a second please, I'm writing.

  4. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Kk. Cause I do have a path to the answer...

  5. ValentinaT
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\frac{ 72 }{ 2 } + \frac{ 72 }{ x } = \frac{ 72 }{ 1.5 }?\]

  6. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    hmm... I can see where you got the 72/2 and 72/1.5.... but the 72/x makes no sense to me.

  7. ValentinaT
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Sorry, I was looking at the example in my book, and tried to model it like it.

  8. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    \(c_1 cpm=\frac{72}{2}\) and \(c_2 cpm=?\) Where cpm is Copies Per Minute \(1.5(c_1 cpm+c_2 cpm)=72\)

  9. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Once you know the CPM for the old copier, you can find out how long it takes to make 72 copies.

  10. ValentinaT
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Sorry, I was writing this down.

  11. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Your method might actually do that in one shot, don't know. You could run it both ways and see.

  12. ValentinaT
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    How do I find the cpm for the old copier? \[1.5(\frac{ 72 }{ 2 } + \frac{ 72 }{ x }) = 72\]?

  13. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    You just need x. Not 72/x.

  14. ValentinaT
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Okay. \[1.5(\frac{ 72 }{ 2 } + x) = 72\]

  15. ValentinaT
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Can you give me a hint on what to do next?

  16. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Move the 1.5 to the other side, do the dractions. They become nice numbers.

  17. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    fractions... oops. I was checking the other way. It would get a very bad number.

  18. ValentinaT
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Okay. \[\frac{ 15 }{ 10 } (\frac{ 72 }{ 2 } + x) = 72\] End up with 12.

  19. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    My version of the work:\[1.5\left(\frac{ 72 }{ 2 } + x\right) = 72 \\ \implies \frac{ 72 }{ 2 } + x = \frac{72}{1.5} \\ \implies 36 + x = 48 \\ \implies x = 48-36 \\ \implies x = 12\]So 12 copies per minute. Then the time for 72 copies is \(\frac{72}{12}\)

  20. ValentinaT
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Okay, thank you.

  21. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Yah, these and riverboat problems are all about finding what is added and what is multiplied. The true goal of word problems is trying to help you figure out how math works in real life rather than just in homework.

  22. ValentinaT
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Okay, 6 minutes.

  23. e.mccormick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    /cheer Yep. Really slow copier.

  24. ValentinaT
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Haha.

  25. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Ask a Question
Find more explanations on OpenStudy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.