anonymous
  • anonymous
Determine f(x) for this derivative
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[\large f'(x)=(-12x^2+8)(2x^2-4x)+(-4x^3+8x)(4x-4)\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
bro just intigrate
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Wait are you finding the anti derivative..?

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anonymous
  • anonymous
@Luigi0210 yes :S & @jishan i am not allowed to integrate
DDCamp
  • DDCamp
First, simplify. Then you should just be able to use the power rule for anti-derivatives.
anonymous
  • anonymous
then how do you find the original function if you can't integrate
Jhannybean
  • Jhannybean
@DDCamp can you elaborate? :D Sprinkle on us your wisdom!
anonymous
  • anonymous
hmm, still confused
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1368925422997:dw|
Jhannybean
  • Jhannybean
oh dear lord your writing...
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Distrubute and then combine like terms
anonymous
  • anonymous
simplify the function given then integrate to get f(x)
Jhannybean
  • Jhannybean
But he says he's not allowed to integrate? That's what's confusing me. how to you find F(x) without integrating?
anonymous
  • anonymous
lol idk anymore
Jhannybean
  • Jhannybean
My mind r gone.
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1368925643123:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
burhan
bahrom7893
  • bahrom7893
Is there a party going on here?
.Sam.
  • .Sam.
Yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
thanks bahrom
Jhannybean
  • Jhannybean
Haha. I'd be able to understand how to solve this problem if only i could make out jishan's writing =_=
anonymous
  • anonymous
i think he simplified the problem but its soo unclear and he also integrated
anonymous
  • anonymous
burhan u understand brother
Jhannybean
  • Jhannybean
I see his integral sign but i cant make out the numbers :(
.Sam.
  • .Sam.
\[\large f(x)=\int\limits\limits (-12x^2+8)(2x^2-4x)+(-4x^3+8x)(4x-4) dx\] \[=\int\limits\limits (4 x-4) \left(8 x-4 x^3\right) \, dx+\int\limits\limits \left(8-12 x^2\right) \left(2 x^2-4 x\right) \, dx\] Expand and integrate using power rule for each term \[\int\limits x^ndx=\frac{x^{n+1}}{n+1}+c\] \[f(x)=\left(-8 x^5+16 x^4+16 x^3-32 x^2\right)+c\]
Jhannybean
  • Jhannybean
Oh I see. Thank you.
anonymous
  • anonymous
now @.Sam. has shed light on what was unseen but i think @burhan101 misinterpreted the question
anonymous
  • anonymous
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QHaVc5i-Dzs
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1368926205410:dw|
.Sam.
  • .Sam.
I don't think you can find f(x) without integrating @galacticwavesXX
anonymous
  • anonymous
that's what i was thinking
anonymous
  • anonymous
You don't need to go through anything elaborate, just look at it. It's fairly clearly a product-rule derivative, so just take the second part of the first term times the first part of the second term. You can add in a constant for good measure.
anonymous
  • anonymous
If you assume f(x) = g(x) * h(x), then f'(x) = g'(x)h(x) + g(x)h'(x). You can just look at the problem and go from there.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I am not allowed to integrate whatsoever for this question !!
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm not talking about any integrating. Look at what I wrote, then look at the question. You can clearly see what h is, and what g is, so you know what f is.
anonymous
  • anonymous
"... are you finding the anti derivative..?" "yes :S" I suppose finding anti-derivative is the same as integrating. If you don't like the integral sign, then you may take the limit of a sum: \[\lim_{x\rightarrow \infty}\sum_{k=1}^{n} y(x_k)\Delta x\], which is the same as integrating the function. For your reference: http://www3.ul.ie/~mlc/support/Loughborough%20website/chap15/15_1.pdf
mathstudent55
  • mathstudent55
|dw:1368942664902:dw|

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