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How does Anne Bradstreet’s faith help her cope with losing all of her possessions?

English
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At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

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Let's see...who's Anne?
An author of this poem.
What poem?

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Other answers:

Uhmmm, I can't recall at the moment.. Just a sec.
Mkay.
In silent night when rest I took For sorrow near I did not look I wakened was with thund’ring noise And piteous shrieks of dreadful voice. That fearful sound of “Fire!” and “Fire!” Let no man know is my desire. I, starting up, the light did spy, And to my God my heart did cry To strengthen me in my distress And not to leave me succorless. Then, coming out, beheld a space The flame consume my dwelling place. And when I could no longer look, I blest His name that gave and took, That laid my goods now in the dust. Yea, so it was, and so ’twas just. It was His own, it was not mine, Far be it that I should repine; He might of all justly bereft But yet sufficient for us left. When by the ruins oft I past My sorrowing eyes aside did cast, And here and there the places spy Where oft I sat and long did lie: Here stood that trunk, and there that chest, There lay that store I counted best. My pleasant things in ashes lie, And them behold no more shall I. Under thy roof no guest shall sit, Nor at thy table eat a bit. No pleasant tale shall e’ er be told, Nor things recounted done of old. No candle e’ er shall shine in thee, Nor bridegroom’s voice e’ er heard shall be. In silence ever shall thou lie, Adieu, Adieu, all’s vanity. Then straight I ’gin my heart to chide, And did thy wealth on earth abide? Didst fix thy hope on mold’ring dust? The arm of flesh didst make thy trust? Raise up thy thoughts above the sky That dunghill mists away may fly. Thou hast an house on high erect, Framed by that mighty Architect, With glory richly furnished, Stands permanent though this be fled. It’s purchased and paid for too By Him who hath enough to do. A price so vast as is unknown Yet by His gift is made thine own; There’s wealth enough, I need no more, Farewell, my pelf, farewell my store. The world no longer let me love, My hope and treasure lies above.
Did you type that?!
No, copied and pasted.
I was like o_o
Lol
Look at www.rhetcomp.gsu.edu/efolio/USERS/Sharon/bradst.doc‎
http://www.rhetcomp.gsu.edu/efolio/USERS/Sharon/bradst.doc‎ ??
Yes.
That tells a little about the poem.
In “Upon the Burning of Our House,” Bradstreet deals with her attachment to earthly possessions when she says, “here stood that trunk, and there that chest/there lay that store I counted best” (29-30).
:o
LAWL.
I ACTUALLY HELPED YOU OMGEE.
Wait,did I? Lol.
When Bradstreet says, “Thou hast an house on high erect, framed by that mighty Architect” (47-49), she comes to terms with the fact that the things of this world are not comparable to what exists in Heaven. Bradstreet goes on to say, “there’s wealth enough, I need no more/Farewell, my pelf, farewell my store” (55-56). In these lines, Bradstreet has abandoned her desire for earthly goods and has moved into an awakening of her spirit. This can be clearly seen in her concluding lines, “My hope and treasure lies above” (58).
Is that from the DOC I linked you to?
DID I HELP YOU? GASP.
Although she does not claim that she is going to Heaven, she does assert that she is hopeful to be among those who are chosen to go to Heaven.
YES, you helped a lot! O-O
GASP!!!!
Out of curiosity,what will you write as your answer to the question?
GASP. *hugs back*
I'm changing my picture to that right this second.
Lol ya. XD
'You're a laugh,Twilight Sparkle. I can't wait to hang out some more'. -Rainbow Dash,to Twilight on the first episode of season one.
OMG :D
Do u remember that quote? XD
Yes!!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIWiFUGxr0c
Awww:)
BFF forever:D
I mean, PFFs forever. XD
x3
:) Now, I must get going. BEFORE I AM STABBED BY THE HISTORY BOOK AGAIN D:
Right, thank you! :D
You're quite welcome. If you need help again,TAG MEH.
:)
Will do, safe flying Dashie. c:
Thanks. PS I feel another fight coming on.
Me and Willis. Maybe,just maybe....
Willis wanted me to join in. I'm too busy for it, so are you.
Yes. You're right.
I'll call it off. Tomorrow then?
Tomorrow c:
*hugs*
*hugs* :3
OMG
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