anonymous
  • anonymous
Please help! f(x) = (x+1)^2/(x-1)(x-2) Prove that f(x) can be written as f(x) = 1-(4/(x-1)) + (9/(x-2)) I understand the partial fractions but I can't see where the 1 comes from! :(
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
1 Attachment
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
so we use partial fractions?
anonymous
  • anonymous
ya use partial fraction

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More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
i'm not sure, i think it can be done without aswell
Loser66
  • Loser66
take long division first.
Loser66
  • Loser66
@Luigi0210 are you with me?
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Yea
Loser66
  • Loser66
ok, wait until the Asker responds.
anonymous
  • anonymous
what am i supposed to be doing? :P i got this:
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1370189518966:dw|
Loser66
  • Loser66
@Luigi0210 knock knock
anonymous
  • anonymous
Let x=1, A=-4 Let x =2, B=9
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Who's there? and that's what I ended up with too but I haven't done partial fractions in a while
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok awesome, where does the 1+ come from?
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[f(x) = -4/(x-1) + 9/(x-2)\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
yay or nay?
Zarkon
  • Zarkon
|dw:1370189894575:dw| doing this...you are saying a quadratic function is equal to a linear function
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh ok...
RadEn
  • RadEn
|dw:1370189891446:dw|
mathstudent55
  • mathstudent55
|dw:1370190009015:dw|
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
I would of never guessed that..
anonymous
  • anonymous
@RadEn what did u do to line 2?
RadEn
  • RadEn
to get the 1 :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
OH I SEE IT!!!! thank you!!
RadEn
  • RadEn
wlcm :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
still dont entirely see why my solution doesn't work?
anonymous
  • anonymous
apart from the fact that...it doesnt work....why is it wrong? thought you could do that with partial fractions?
RadEn
  • RadEn
|dw:1370190554601:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok i think i understand :) thank you so much :)
RadEn
  • RadEn
|dw:1370190855282:dw|
RadEn
  • RadEn
(5x-1)/(x^2-3x+2) = A/(x-1) + B(x-2)
anonymous
  • anonymous
so that can be done because its linear on top
RadEn
  • RadEn
yup, exactly
anonymous
  • anonymous
is it do with rationality?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Aha..."a proper rational function is one in which the degree of the numerator is less than the denominator" so a partial fraction must be proper to be solved. Thank you everyone <3
radar
  • radar
This has been one the best solution threads I read in a long time. I wish I could award medals to all that participated.

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