anonymous
  • anonymous
@experimentX Let go here
Physics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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anonymous
  • anonymous
Better for us to use illustrations to prove our point.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@experimentX check this out:
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1370500622725:dw| Two loops of wire.

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anonymous
  • anonymous
As you can see BOTH are closed. So current can flow in both and lenz's law is still in effect.
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1370500680648:dw| The X mark spot, is now open meaning the loop is not a "closed" path.
anonymous
  • anonymous
current can NOT flow through both of them regardless of the size.
experimentX
  • experimentX
|dw:1370500687343:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yea, but again. Having a larger thickness means there will be more charge to flow from a higher potential to a lower one. But think about it, even if EMF was applied to move te charge from a high potential to low, it can't mainly because the path in which it can move in is open. So it is stuck in the same place unable to move.
experimentX
  • experimentX
|dw:1370501097487:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
Hmmm interesting.
experimentX
  • experimentX
|dw:1370501238840:dw|
experimentX
  • experimentX
|dw:1370501374693:dw|
experimentX
  • experimentX
but generally when we consider a wire, we mean think wire ... of course there is no eddy current. so faraday's law comes in to play.
anonymous
  • anonymous
So if there was a larger coil in a open circuit will there be induced current? Can it oppose a magnet that is the cause of "change"? I assume that there is no flow of current in a coil that is a series of loops thus as you said the cannot spin and finally, the magnet moves freely with not magnetic resistance?
experimentX
  • experimentX
no it won't ..
anonymous
  • anonymous
What wont? The magnet or the current flow?
experimentX
  • experimentX
the current won't flow and the magnet won't be opposed
anonymous
  • anonymous
you sure 100% :P? I have a good essay to talk about, and it revoles about using methods that lenz's law is not effective! I want to be sure as much as I can!
experimentX
  • experimentX
Well ... you meant|dw:1370502000264:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ow yeaaaaa
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1370502300630:dw| Im using something like this diagram. I'll even do an experiment for this, and pass a strong magnet in and out of the coil while the circuit is open.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Fascinating thing, but its a really interesting idea you told me about the large bar... But, what if the coil had thick wires? It certainly will oppose the magnet!
experimentX
  • experimentX
thick means ... too thick for a wire. watch this video lecture http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qxuGDEz8wDg
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
be back when im done.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Back, very interesting lecture! Still current flows in a "open" loop. The resistance is MUCH higher so the magnetic resistance is just less. The coil in my diagram will generate a current and it will oppose the magnet but very very very very weak resistance. Perhaps unnoticeable, but still exists.
experimentX
  • experimentX
the current that you are talking about is from the diffusion of charge .. it is negligible
anonymous
  • anonymous
@experimentX I don't have to worry about a magnet passing through a coil in a open circuit, its going to have 0 magnet resistance, its velocity will not drop at all. I got the idea, thanks.
experimentX
  • experimentX
yw

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