anonymous
  • anonymous
Explain how xylem and phloem contribute to the strength of wood.
Biology
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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chestercat
  • chestercat
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anonymous
  • anonymous
I found this site that explains it, but I need it dumbed down for me. I'm having a hard time trying to understand exactly what it's saying. Here's the site: http://faculty.unlv.edu/landau/wood.htm
abb0t
  • abb0t
Xylem and phloem make up the big transportation system of vascular plants. As you get bigger, it is more difficult to transport nutrients, water, and sugars around your body. You have a circulatory system if you want to keep growing. As plants evolved to be larger, they also developed their own kind of circulatory systems. The main parts you will hear a lot about are called xylem and phloem. It all starts with a top and a bottom. Logically, it makes sense. Trees and other vascular plants have a top and a bottom. The top has a trunk, branches, leaves, or needles. The bottom is a system of roots. Each needs the other to survive. The roots hold the plant steady and grab moisture and nutrients from the soil. The top is in the light, conducting photosynthesis and helping the plant reproduce. You have to connect the two parts. That's where xylem and phloem come in. The fun never stops in the plant's circulatory system. Most plants have green leaves, where the photosynthesis happens. When those sugars are made, they need to be given to every cell in the plant for energy. Enter phloem. The phloem cells are laid out end-to-end throughout the entire plant, transporting the sugars and other molecules created by the plant. Phloem is always alive. Xylem tissue dies after one year and then develops anew (rings in the tree trunk). What is the best way to think about phloem? Think about sap coming out of a tree. That dripping sap usually comes from the phloem. SOURCE: http://www.biology4kids.com/files/plants_xylemphloem.html
anonymous
  • anonymous
*Waits for teacher( @thomaster )*

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thomaster
  • thomaster
@Kitt020912 did abb0t answer your question? or do you need more explanation?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Still need help, because I still didn't really see how what abb0t said answered the question: "how xylem and phloem contribute to the strength of wood." Very nice information you found though, abb0t.
TheStudyOwl
  • TheStudyOwl
Hey kitt, I found these definitions I think might help: "Xylem takes water ( + minerals) from the roots to leaves (so photosynthesis can take place) Phloem transports the sugars made (plus other things) mainly from the leaves (the products of photosynthesis mainly) to parts of the plant where its needed or to storage areas eg roots in eg pototoes." Credit: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070905213301AAFBlpa Hope I helped(:
TheStudyOwl
  • TheStudyOwl
I just re-read your question...sorry missed "in wood" lol I'll go try and find something else...(:
TheStudyOwl
  • TheStudyOwl
I think might help: http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/Biology/botf99/imagesfor%20questions/stemrtimagesf/woodytissue.html Hope I helped(:
anonymous
  • anonymous
I read the link as mcdonalds lol, let me look at it. c:
TheStudyOwl
  • TheStudyOwl
haha(:
anonymous
  • anonymous
Helpful, but I still need it dumbed down. .-.
abb0t
  • abb0t
|dw:1370640105485:dw|
thomaster
  • thomaster
@abb0t You're an artist
TheStudyOwl
  • TheStudyOwl
Sorry -.- lol, that face is amazing...
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1370640361631:dw|
thomaster
  • thomaster
|dw:1370640835653:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
ERMAHGERD DAT FAIS
thomaster
  • thomaster
so.. @Kitt020912 did that answer your question? \(\Huge\sf\color{lime}{ :3}\)
anonymous
  • anonymous
no .-.
anonymous
  • anonymous
\(\Huge\sf\color{darkorchid}x\sf\color{darkorchid}3\)
anonymous
  • anonymous
I am not sure whether this will answer your question but here's my try at it: Xylem cells are certainly dead at maturity, and it is these cells that make up the majority of what we call wood. The cambium cells divide and differentiate into xylem cells, the walls of which are impregnated with lignin. Secondary xylem to inside of vascular cambium accumulates in annual growth rings, while secondary phloem is added up to outside of vascular cambium. The secondary xylem layer is what contributes to the strength of the wood. This might help you to see the direction of cell differentiation.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thanks @emcrazy14 That should help a little bit.
anonymous
  • anonymous
yw! :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
@thomaster do you mind explaining the strength for me? :o
thomaster
  • thomaster
Okay secondary xylem and phloem cells have a double cell wall. When these are impregnated with lignin, they become hard. Also the structure and arrangement of xylem and phloem determine the strenght of the wood.

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