Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

ParthKohli

  • 2 years ago

Classical Mechanics: circular motion

  • This Question is Closed
  1. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1370882795176:dw|Find the time when the particles collide.

  2. kutabs
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    What is the thing written on the left side of the diagram?

  3. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @kutabs 2 rad/s So this time I tried to do with the fact that \(\theta_1 + \theta_2 = \dfrac{3\pi}{2}\) and using the equations of motion.

  4. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    That isn't a problem at all. The problem is that there are more questions. I am not able to figure out \(a_R\) of each particle at the time of collision.

  5. amistre64
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    is teh acceleration given for the 2rad/sec speed?

  6. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yes.

  7. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ah, no worries, I get it. It's easy to find \(v\) for each particle after I get the \(t\). Thank you for the time guys.

  8. amistre64
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    this is then the same as the last question really\[-\frac12a_1t^2-v_1t+d_1=\frac12a_2t^2+v_2t+d_2\]

  9. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\theta_1 = 2t \]\[\theta_2 = t + t^2\]Thank you, I can manage after that.

  10. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I was just having this little confusion that I cleared myself. :-|

  11. kutabs
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Let them meet at the angle theta as shown |dw:1370883098101:dw| For 1: Covering pi/2+(pi/2-theta)= omega*t For 2: Covering pi/2+theta= omega*t+1/2*alpha*(t^2)

  12. kutabs
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Now from these two equations 1&2there are 2 variables theta and time (t). Solve them, and you'll get the result.

  13. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy