UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
What chemical is the most similar chemical to water, and why?
Chemistry
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
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abb0t
  • abb0t
Isn't it that fake hydrogen thing, deuterium, \(D_2O\)
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
i would say that deuterium oxide is chemically identical to hydrogen oxide
abb0t
  • abb0t
I'm confused. Meep

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UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
I mean generally similar, so you can use whatever similarities you think are most important (im not looking for one answer) im looking for lots of interesting answers with good justification
chmvijay
  • chmvijay
H2S having similar structure of water :) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_sulfide
chmvijay
  • chmvijay
SeH2 is also looks like same. i am saying its based on structure similarities https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_selenide
chmvijay
  • chmvijay
this another one https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_telluride
abb0t
  • abb0t
There's also other molecules like acids that look like water. Lol
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
that's a good start
abb0t
  • abb0t
Basically you're naming anything with same point group, \(C_{2v}\) @chmvijay
chmvijay
  • chmvijay
thank you @UnkleRhaukus interms of symmetry u can think of any ben molecules like SO2 etc :)
chmvijay
  • chmvijay
yaa you are right @abb0t
abb0t
  • abb0t
\(\huge C_{2v}\)
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
what is \(C_{2v}\) ?
abb0t
  • abb0t
Point group*
abb0t
  • abb0t
Auto correct on my tablet sucks.
abb0t
  • abb0t
Relates structures with similar structures are assigned a point group, in the case of water it's yeah, \(C_{2v}\) and as chmvajay said earlier those molecules also exhibit same point group. But doesn't mean they behave the same.just structurally the same.
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
perhaps you would like to go into some more detail @abb0t , ,
chmvijay
  • chmvijay
how about these O2F http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxygen_difluoride OCl2 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dichlorine_monoxide
abb0t
  • abb0t
I would but I don't think I can draw on my tablet...but I really would. I will try and explain best I can in short sentence...
chmvijay
  • chmvijay
|dw:1370934124890:dw|
abb0t
  • abb0t
Basically if you place water on a plane (3-coordinate) you will see that it has an axis of rotation on z-axis of 2 That means if one hydrogen is labeled A and other on the right B and rotate it 180° on x-axis, A then becomes B and B becomes....Yeah as chm vajay said...lol
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
OK so i get the geometric similarities, How come all the above suggestions are gasses at stp, whereas H20 is liquid
abb0t
  • abb0t
\(D_2O\) isn't :) it's liquid
UnkleRhaukus
  • UnkleRhaukus
Yeah but \(\text D_2\text O\equiv\, {_1^2\text H}_2 \,_8^{16}\text O\) is the same chemical as water
abb0t
  • abb0t
Yes. React the same.
abb0t
  • abb0t
Idk if properties are same, but maybe. Never worked with it myself in a lab. Neither in my research lab. I know it can also react same as a ligand, and also in hydrogenation reaction, such as lindbar.

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