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vknight33

  • one year ago

Consider the following algorithm. x ← 1 for i is in {1, 2, 3, 4} do for j is in {1, 2, 3} do x ← x + x for k is in {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6} do x ← x + 1 x ← x + 5 Count the number of + operations done by this algorithm.

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  1. chris00
    • one year ago
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    not my style of question. haha

  2. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    it looks like some type of for/next looping but the syntax is hard to parse

  3. vknight33
    • one year ago
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    Its suppose to be discrete mathematics. I am not a math person at all.

  4. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    its countable ... but the syntax/notation is hard to read thru. without knowing what the format is trying to convey its difficult to understand the process that is being described

  5. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    was this a write up or did you copy/paste it?

  6. vknight33
    • one year ago
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    I will do a screenshot and paste it here hang on

  7. vknight33
    • one year ago
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    Here it is

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  8. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    hmm, im guessing it follows as such: x = 1 for i = 1 to 4 for j = 1 to 3; x=x+x for k = 1 to 6; x=x+1, x=x+5 4(3(1)+6(2)) operations is what it looks like to me

  9. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    x=n [x = n+n x = (n+n)+(n+n) x = (n+n)+(n+n)+(n+n)+(n+n) = 8(n) ] [x = 8(n)+6] x = 1 x'= 8(1)+6 x'= 8(8(14)+6)+6 x'= 8(8(8(14)+6)+6)+6 x'= 8(8(8(8(14)+6)+6)+6)+6 x = 60854

  10. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    pfft, i left the 14 in there ... should be a 1 :)

  11. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    x = 7606 if its 1 to start with

  12. vknight33
    • one year ago
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    Is that the answer for "Count the number of + operations done by this algorithm."

  13. amistre64
    • one year ago
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    of course not, i already surmised the results for that .... this was just an attempt to actually work the algorithm to see what the output would give us ...

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