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kaylala

  • 2 years ago

Are the following algebraic expressions a POLYNOMIAL OR NOT? 1. (square root of ) x^3 y^2 z 2. 12ab^2 -------- 5ab 3. -3 ------- xy 4. 9(cube root of z) 5. ((square root of 3) x^2 y^3) / 4xy^2

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  1. julian25
    • 2 years ago
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    they r not, in the polinomila the exponents must be integers

  2. bahrom7893
    • 2 years ago
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    ^ positive integers

  3. bahrom7893
    • 2 years ago
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    and the answer's wrong. I can see at least one expression, which, when simplified, becomes a polynomial.

  4. kaylala
    • 2 years ago
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    @bahrom7893 what expression can be a polynomial?

  5. bahrom7893
    • 2 years ago
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    Simplify each of them and post what you get.

  6. thinker
    • 2 years ago
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    @kaylala : polynomial is something which has power of an integer, not a fraction Say x^2 is a polynomial , not x^2/3 I hope you got this one.

  7. kaylala
    • 2 years ago
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    @bahrom7893 1. cant be simplified 2. 12b^2 --------- 5 3. still the same 4. same 5. (square root of 3) xy ------------------ 4 ??????

  8. bahrom7893
    • 2 years ago
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    well technically x^2/3 is a polynomial, x^(2/3) is not.

  9. bahrom7893
    • 2 years ago
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    So once you have simplified it, which one ends up with positive integer exponents?

  10. kaylala
    • 2 years ago
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    @bahrom7893 where did you get x^2/3?

  11. bahrom7893
    • 2 years ago
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    nvm that, it was from an example that thinker was talking about. From your own simplified post. Which of those expressions have positive integer exponents?

  12. kaylala
    • 2 years ago
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    so, what's the answer per number item?

  13. bahrom7893
    • 2 years ago
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    I'm not going to give you the answer. You are 90% there. Can you just answer which of the expressions, when simplified end up with positive integer exponents? <- that expression will be your answer.

  14. kaylala
    • 2 years ago
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    number 2?

  15. bahrom7893
    • 2 years ago
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    yes

  16. kaylala
    • 2 years ago
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    but # 2 has a denominator??

  17. bahrom7893
    • 2 years ago
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    but not in the exponent

  18. kaylala
    • 2 years ago
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    doesnt # 2 have a variable in the denominator? @bahrom7893

  19. bahrom7893
    • 2 years ago
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    2. 12b^2 -------- where do you see a variable in the denominator? 5

  20. kaylala
    • 2 years ago
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    ohhh..ok so the variable hence is a letter. is # 2 the only polynomial out of all? @bahrom7893

  21. bahrom7893
    • 2 years ago
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    yes. basically polynomials follow a form a*x^(n) where a can be any number, n has to be a positive integer.

  22. kaylala
    • 2 years ago
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    ok. thanks @bahrom7893

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