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Mikeyy64

  • 2 years ago

Simplify:

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  1. Mikeyy64
    • 2 years ago
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    \[\frac{ 15x + 15 }{ x^2 - 1 }\]

  2. Compassionate
    • 2 years ago
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    Hello, my name is Stephen and I will be your tutor. The first step is to factor the bottom terms and top terms, do you see any possible factors, Mikeyy?

  3. Mikeyy64
    • 2 years ago
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    15(x + 1) -------- (x - 1)(x + 1)

  4. Mikeyy64
    • 2 years ago
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    Is that correct?

  5. Compassionate
    • 2 years ago
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    Correct! Now, you see the x + 1's will cancel, leaving you with \[\frac{ 15 }{ x - 1 }\]

  6. Mikeyy64
    • 2 years ago
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    So: (x + 1) would cancel out (x + 1) and not (x - 1) I thought negative would cancel out a positive and other way around. That's where I got confused.

  7. Compassionate
    • 2 years ago
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    No, that's not the case. Only like terms can cancel each other, for example, if I had \[\frac{ x - y }{ x - a }\] The terms cannot cancel, nor can the x's, because x - y and x - a, are terms themselves. You need to understand that. Now, if I had: x - y over x - y, then I could cancel. Only terms that are exactly the same can be canceled.

  8. Mikeyy64
    • 2 years ago
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    Oh okay, thank you for that information ^.^

  9. Compassionate
    • 2 years ago
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    You're welcome! OpenStudy On ~~

  10. Mikeyy64
    • 2 years ago
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    You too (:

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