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WiseOlMoosey

  • 2 years ago

How would I find the domain and range of (2)/(x^2-2x-3)? Is the domain x=-1 x=3

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  1. cwrw238
    • 2 years ago
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    try factoring the denominator what values of x are not possible?

  2. WiseOlMoosey
    • 2 years ago
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    x=-1 and x=3

  3. cwrw238
    • 2 years ago
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    the domain is all possible values of x

  4. cwrw238
    • 2 years ago
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    right

  5. cwrw238
    • 2 years ago
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    so -1 and 3 are not in the domain

  6. mathstudent55
    • 2 years ago
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    The domain is the values that x can have. y = 2/(x^2 - 2x - 3) has a denominator. Since division by zero is not allowed, you need to find which values of x would make the denominator zero. To do that, solve (which you did) x^2 - 2x - 3 = 0 (x - 3)(x + 1) = 0 x = 3 or x = -1 These are the value of x that must be excluded from the domain, so the domain is all real numbers except x = 3 and x = -1.

  7. WiseOlMoosey
    • 2 years ago
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    oh so all reals except x=-1 and x=3 for the domain

  8. cwrw238
    • 2 years ago
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    yup

  9. WiseOlMoosey
    • 2 years ago
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    ok thanks! but what about the range?

  10. cwrw238
    • 2 years ago
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    the range is all possible values of f(x)

  11. cwrw238
    • 2 years ago
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    so can you figure that out?

  12. WiseOlMoosey
    • 2 years ago
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    um how would i set it up?

  13. WiseOlMoosey
    • 2 years ago
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    dang ok.. don't solve it for me but how would i go about that?

  14. cwrw238
    • 2 years ago
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    well for a start the values of f(x) corresponding to x=3 or -1 will be excluded

  15. WiseOlMoosey
    • 2 years ago
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    Couldn't I find the inverse of the function and then find the domain?

  16. WiseOlMoosey
    • 2 years ago
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    @cwrw238

  17. cwrw238
    • 2 years ago
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    yes the inverse of the function has domain which equals range of the function

  18. WiseOlMoosey
    • 2 years ago
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    ok thanks for your time and patience!

  19. cwrw238
    • 2 years ago
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    yw

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