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kt.venkatesan

  • one year ago

Each electron in an atom will have same charge and attributes but will be in different energy level, what makes it to be in discrete energy levels?

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  1. Diwakar
    • one year ago
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    it is because angular momentum can have only discrete values. This is a postulate of Bohr's theory of structure of atom. \( J = nh/2 \pi\) n can take only integral values starting from 1. This allows only discrete value of energy.

  2. kt.venkatesan
    • one year ago
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    Yes, I agree with the discrete energy level concept. But I’m asking why the identical electrons to be in different energy levels. If no more properties are there and all electrons are identical, then why electrons emits radiation when jumping from one energy level to other and makes an atom unstable. I think there are some parameters hidden behind it and each electron may differ with some parameter. The parameter may be velocity?!

  3. theEric
    • one year ago
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    I think each electron has a unique state. There are three quantum numbers: n, l, and m. No two electrons in an atom will have all three numbers the same. That's what I was taught.

  4. theEric
    • one year ago
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    Also, I think electrons do change energy levels very fast. Then light is radiated away.

  5. souvik
    • one year ago
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    Bohr's model states that every electron has a potential energy and kinetic energy as it rotates around the nucleus...electrons with the same orbit have same energy(potential energy + kinetic energy)...it depends how far the electron is from the nucleus...

  6. theEric
    • one year ago
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    I see...

  7. RaphaelFilgueiras
    • one year ago
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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balmer_series

  8. Mashy
    • one year ago
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    are you talking about electrons of different atoms of a solid maybe?.. then even THEY ARE ALL IN DIFFERENT ENERGY STATES.. that shoudl be your real question.. how every electron of every atom can be in a different state?

  9. chenping
    • one year ago
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    Please refer to Pauli's Exclusion Rule. Find out more about electron's spinning. https://www.boundless.com/chemistry/introduction-to-quantum-theory/quantum-mechanical-description-of-the-atomic-orbital/the-pauli-exclusion-principle/

  10. koushik_ksv
    • one year ago
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    According to the Bohr's postulate, there should be quantization of angular momentum. There is no question of why,since its a postulate. It can only be either proved or disproved. We have a better theory, the quantum mechanical model. Even on solving the schrodinger's equation,we get quantized states for a electron.

  11. wini_boson
    • one year ago
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    An electron in an atom is confined to that atom and in quantum mechanics wherever there is confinement there is quantisation. If you treat electron as wave then its wavelength is defined according to DeBrogile's equation. And to survive this wave in any orbit, the length of the orbit should be an integer multiple of the wavelength of the electron. Not only this there are lots of reason that will you get if you actually solve the Shrodinger's equation for the given system.

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