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Loser66

  • 2 years ago

new one

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  1. Loser66
    • 2 years ago
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    \[[\large \log \sqrt{x^2+y^2}]' = \dfrac{1}{\sqrt {x^2+y^2}} \times \dfrac{d}{dx}(\sqrt{x^2+y^2}) \\ \large = \dfrac{1}{\sqrt {x^2+y^2}} \times \dfrac{1}{2 \sqrt{x^2+y^2}}\dfrac{d}{dx}(x^2+y^2)=....\] [\large \log \sqrt{x^2+y^2}]' = \dfrac{1}{\sqrt {x^2+y^2}} \times \dfrac{d}{dx}(\sqrt{x^2+y^2}) \\ \large = \dfrac{1}{\sqrt {x^2+y^2}} \times \dfrac{1}{2 \sqrt{x^2+y^2}}\dfrac{d}{dx}(x^2+y^2)=....

  2. Loser66
    • 2 years ago
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    \[[\large \log \sqrt{x^2+y^2}]' = \frac{1}{\sqrt {x^2+y^2}} \times \frac{d}{dx}(\sqrt{x^2+y^2}) \\ \large = \frac{1}{\sqrt {x^2+y^2}} \times \frac{1}{2 \sqrt{x^2+y^2}}\frac{d}{dx}(x^2+y^2)=....\] [\large \log \sqrt{x^2+y^2}]' = \frac{1}{\sqrt {x^2+y^2}} \times \frac{d}{dx}(\sqrt{x^2+y^2}) \\ \large = \frac{1}{\sqrt {x^2+y^2}} \times \frac{1}{2 \sqrt{x^2+y^2}}\frac{d}{dx}(x^2+y^2)=....

  3. hartnn
    • 2 years ago
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    same syntax ? no... the first one is \dfrac and 2nd is just \frac \(\dfrac{test}{this }\) `\(\dfrac{test}{this }\)` compared to \(\frac{test}{this }\) `\(\frac{test}{this }\)`

  4. hartnn
    • 2 years ago
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    i can see the first one having bold line

  5. thomaster
    • 2 years ago
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    Stange,, the first one is bold here, the second one not while 1 minute ago it was first normal second bold 0.o

  6. Loser66
    • 2 years ago
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    \[\dfrac{dummyme}{dontknowhowtodo}\]\[\frac{needtimetopractice}{nodumbanymore}\]

  7. hartnn
    • 2 years ago
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    zoom in your page to see the difference

  8. Loser66
    • 2 years ago
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    yup, different . thanks

  9. Loser66
    • 2 years ago
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    thank you.

  10. Loser66
    • 2 years ago
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    @thomaster after a long time of writing, nothing pops up, why?

  11. thomaster
    • 2 years ago
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    I was trying if I could make a bold division bar with normal numerator and denominator :P

  12. Loser66
    • 2 years ago
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    \[\huge\dfrac{\frac{aaaaaaa}{bbbbbbbbb}}{\frac{ccccccccccccccc}{ddddddddddddd}}\] hihihihi.... quite clear, right/

  13. thomaster
    • 2 years ago
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    you can make the middle division bar longer by adding some spaces \(\huge\dfrac{~\dfrac{a}{b}~}{\dfrac{c}{d}}\)

  14. thomaster
    • 2 years ago
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    `\(\huge\dfrac{~\dfrac{a}{b}~}{\dfrac{c}{d}}\)`

  15. Loser66
    • 2 years ago
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    1~ just a little bit longer, what if I want to make it loooooonger?

  16. thomaster
    • 2 years ago
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    \(\huge\dfrac{~~~~~~~\dfrac{a}{b}~~~~~~~}{\dfrac{c}{d}}\)

  17. hartnn
    • 2 years ago
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    \(He \quad hi\) `\(\dfrac{test}{this }\)` use \quad for longer spaces

  18. hartnn
    • 2 years ago
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    `\(He \quad hi\)`

  19. thomaster
    • 2 years ago
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    or `\hspace{20pt}` you can make the space as long as you want by changing the 20

  20. Loser66
    • 2 years ago
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    \[He\hspace{50pt} hi\]yep, gotit

  21. Loser66
    • 2 years ago
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    \[\left[\begin{matrix}a & b \\ c & d\end{matrix}\right] *\left[\begin{matrix}a&b\\c&d\end{matrix}\right]=\left[\begin{matrix}-1&0\\0&-1\end{matrix}\right]\]

  22. Loser66
    • 2 years ago
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    I practice, hihi

  23. Loser66
    • 2 years ago
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    how to make -/+ in order?

  24. thomaster
    • 2 years ago
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    \(\Large \pm\) ??

  25. thomaster
    • 2 years ago
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    more symbols: http://omega.albany.edu:8008/Symbols.html

  26. caozeyuan
    • 2 years ago
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    thanks! It helps, amistre64 's explanation sucks!

  27. Loser66
    • 2 years ago
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    I saw someone posted something and had a code at the middle of the text without taking another line, for example: sin\theta = \frac {1}{5}. but I don't know how to do. When I write, it always jumps into the next line. Show me, please @e.mccormick

  28. e.mccormick
    • 2 years ago
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    Bla bla \(\backslash (\)some latex\) bla bla. That type inline?

  29. Loser66
    • 2 years ago
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    e.mccormick is sin\(\theta\) and I got it \(\text {thank you}\)

  30. e.mccormick
    • 2 years ago
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    Kk. Have fun!

  31. Loser66
    • 2 years ago
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    you too

  32. Loser66
    • 2 years ago
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    and how to make it be bold

  33. e.mccormick
    • 2 years ago
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    This is where \tfrac{}{} and \dfrac{}{} can also help. \tfrac{}{}, Text Fraction, means to make it small, like inline text, no matter what. \dfrac{}{}, Display fraction, means make it large, like it was a stand alone equation, no matter what. This line is with \(\frac{1}{2}\) just \frac{}{} This line is with \(\tfrac{1}{2}\) just \tfrac{}{} This line is with \(\dfrac{1}{2}\) just \dfrac{}{} This block is with \[\frac{1}{2}\] just \frac{}{} This block is with \[\tfrac{1}{2}\] just \tfrac{}{} This block is with \[\dfrac{1}{2}\] just \dfrac{}{} Notice that the frac changes if it is inline or in a block, \(\backslash\)[ BLOCK \]. But the dfrac and tfrac do not.

  34. e.mccormick
    • 2 years ago
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    Fonts use \mathbb{text}, \mathbf{text}, \mathit{text}, and so on. http://www.codecogs.com/eqneditor shows them all at the top.

  35. Loser66
    • 2 years ago
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    let me practice \(\tfrac{you}{me}\) and \(\dfrac{you}{me}\) how about \(\frac {you}{me}\)

  36. Loser66
    • 2 years ago
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    the first and the last are the same, right?

  37. e.mccormick
    • 2 years ago
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    The math fonts are for equations, but same ones are there for text. here is why: \textbf{Some text with spaces} \(\textbf{Some text with spaces}\) \mathbf{Some text with spaces} \(\mathbf{Some text with spaces}\) See the spaces and what happens to them in math mode?

  38. Loser66
    • 2 years ago
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    I can see the difference. b stands for bold?

  39. e.mccormick
    • 2 years ago
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    Yes, the first and last are the same. Where the [d|t]frac comes in really handy is when you need to make sure one is a large fraction inside another fraction. Or small, and so on. Large inline with text, so it is clear...

  40. e.mccormick
    • 2 years ago
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    BoldFace ITalics BlackBoard RoMan TextwriTer

  41. e.mccormick
    • 2 years ago
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    Not all of them are supported, like \textsc fails with MathJax.... SmallCaps.

  42. Loser66
    • 2 years ago
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    \(\textbf{get nothing, hehe}\) \(\text{now, get a lot, hihi}\)

  43. e.mccormick
    • 2 years ago
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    The link is an editor interface.

  44. e.mccormick
    • 2 years ago
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    With the t/d fracs you can do \(\dfrac{d}{dx}\left( \dfrac{\dfrac{\tfrac{\pi}{4}+e^x}{x^e}}{14x^6+12x^3-7i}\right )\) inline and it is still readable.

  45. caozeyuan
    • 2 years ago
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    what are you guys talking about, I cannot understand a word!

  46. e.mccormick
    • 2 years ago
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    @caozeyuan We are talking about \(\LaTeX\). @Loser66 Attached is what I was saying about the safety bar was attached wrong.

  47. caozeyuan
    • 2 years ago
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    @e.mccormick so how can I use it in everyday life e.g. when writing an email or a doc. ?

  48. e.mccormick
    • 2 years ago
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    \(\LaTeX\) has many editors, which make it great for writing papers, books, and so on. Especially ones with formulas and graphs. In fact, I linked one in another post recently.

  49. caozeyuan
    • 2 years ago
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    Tag me Please! I want to get that! is it for free?

  50. e.mccormick
    • 2 years ago
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    Near the bottom of this is a PDF with vectors, all done in \(\LaTeX\) http://openstudy.com/study#/updates/51ed5575e4b00daf471999bb And here is a bit on using the codes to do posts here. http://openstudy.com/study#/updates/51d89020e4b041c5c27459bb The same MathJax plugin can be added to blogs and other sites to do similar things elsewhere.

  51. e.mccormick
    • 2 years ago
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    Yes. \(\LaTeX\) is free. For doing papers, I use MiKTeX on Windows as my TeX rendering engine and TeXmaker as my editor. However, to just try it for free you can use one of the online ones. https://www.writelatex.com/ http://www.codecogs.com/latex/eqneditor.php (Equations only, but makes them into grapics!) http://www.scribtex.com/ https://www.sharelatex.com/

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