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douglas12

  • 2 years ago

Use natural logarithms to solve the equation. Round to the nearest thousandth. 5e^2x+8=22 A. 0.515 B. 0.264 C. 0.896 D. –3.259

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  1. dan815
    • 2 years ago
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    what are you having trouble with

  2. campbell_st
    • 2 years ago
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    is the question \[5e^{2x + 8} = 22\] or \[5 e^{2x} + 8 = 22\]

  3. douglas12
    • 2 years ago
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    the second one

  4. campbell_st
    • 2 years ago
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    ok... so the 1st step is subtract 8 from both sides of the equation. then divide both sides of the equation by 5 what do you get?

  5. dan815
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1373574672837:dw|

  6. dan815
    • 2 years ago
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    you got it from there?

  7. dan815
    • 2 years ago
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    you must use ln to cancel e

  8. dan815
    • 2 years ago
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    ln means log of base e

  9. dan815
    • 2 years ago
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    so if you have log of base e of somethinh e to power something then the power must be your simplification

  10. jdoe0001
    • 2 years ago
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    $$ \large { \text{log cancellation rule}\\ \color{blue}{log_aa^x = x}\\ e^{2x} = whatever\\ ln = log_e\\ log_e(e^{2x}) = log_e(whatever)\\ 2x = log_e(whatever) } $$

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