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Ennui Group Title

Can anyone suggest a few textbooks that might be helpful in either setting a good foundation for this course or following along with the course material itself? Thanks!

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. creeksider Group Title
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    Although the course is designed to be self-contained, I found myself wanting to supplement it with a textbook. Poking around a bit, I got the impression that when the course was originally taught, the students were assigned Calculus with Analytic Geometry by George F. Simmons (2d ed.). A new copy runs about $200. I would rate the book excellent, one of the best math books I've seen. The book offers a huge number of exercises, and includes answers (but no explanations) to the odd numbered exercises. If you're willing to spend another $100 or so, you can get the Student Solutions Manual, which shows how to work through those exercises (still just the odd-numbered ones, but that's plenty). You may or may not feel the need for this. To me it was worth it. As for setting a foundation, the first chapter of this text (about 50 pages) offers a condensed review of many of the key points, and other topics are reviewed when needed (the chapter that derives calculus formulas for exponential and logarithm functions begins with a review of those functions, and same for trig functions). The same author has an inexpensive paperback called Precalculus Mathematics in a Nutshell, which offers a condensed review of pretty much all you're expected to know as you begin to tackle calculus. I worked through this and found it helpful, but much of the same material appears in the main text. The course doesn't exactly follow the Simmons text but I suspect there isn't any text out there that corresponds to the course. The main differences I've noticed so far are that Prof. Jerison covers all derivatives before getting into integrals, and also includes much more on the topic of linear and quadratic approximation than you'll find in the text (or at least, more than I've found so far in the text). If you're on a tight budget, the CK-12 math books (including algebra, trig and calculus) are available in free electronic format. You can get them in the Amazon Kindle store and if you don't have a Kindle, download a free Kindle app to read them on your computer or tablet. But if you can afford the Simmons text, you'll learn the material more easily and quickly.

    • one year ago
  2. Discordian93 Group Title
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    Also, there is Strang's calculus textbook on MIT ocw, look for it in supplementary resocures, and of course http://www.math.wisc.edu/~keisler/calc.html which is a kind of wird calculus textbook that approcahes calculus from a very different perspective than this course.

    • one year ago
  3. Chats Group Title
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    Thomas' Calculus

    • one year ago
  4. snowy_owl Group Title
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    My math skills were weak. I tried to take this course, but some concepts were difficult to understand; so I found an useful book about Precalculus. I read it and did the exercises and was an enormous help, now I feel confident to take this course. Here is the link of the book: http://www.math.washington.edu/~m120/TheBook/TB2011-12.pdf

    • one year ago
  5. indieveloper11 Group Title
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    I found a good link for some open source calculus textbooks, and also a link to 2 more textbooks. These should help! : ) http://mathmamawrites.blogspot.com/2012/08/open-source-textbooks-for-calculus-and.html http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Calculus http://www.maa.org/publications/maa-reviews/single-and-multivariable-calculus

    • one year ago
  6. Dog_Rob Group Title
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    It's not a text book but I found the trigonometry and calculus lectures in the Khan Academy playlists of the same names on youtube to be enough of a grounding that I didn't feel too lost. http://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4a-Gbdw7vOaccHmFo40b9g (I didn't know what a sine or tangent was before watching them.

    • one year ago
  7. barney Group Title
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    can i have s.e.x with you

    • 10 months ago
  8. barney Group Title
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    s.e.x

    • 10 months ago
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