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bumblebee3

  • 2 years ago

A spherical water balloon has a radius of 6 inches. How many cubic inches of water will it hold? a. 288ð in.3 b. 78ð in.3 c. 216ð in.3 d. 144ð in.3

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  1. Hero
    • 2 years ago
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    \[V_{\text{sphere}} = \frac{4\pi r^3}{3}\]

  2. bumblebee3
    • 2 years ago
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    @Hero I got 904.7808

  3. bumblebee3
    • 2 years ago
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    What does this symbol mean? ð

  4. Hero
    • 2 years ago
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    pi I suppose.

  5. theEric
    • 2 years ago
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    I got the same volume formula and my volume on the windows calculator was \(904.7786842338604526772412943845\) using its estimation of \(pi\). The exact answer is \(288\ \pi\).

  6. Hero
    • 2 years ago
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    288 pi = 904.7808

  7. theEric
    • 2 years ago
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    And so I agree with @Hero again. Maybe it was just an issue with the computer code. I don't see why anyone would substitute a symbol for \(\pi\) if that's what that means.

  8. theEric
    • 2 years ago
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    And the units are \([\text{in.}^2]\)

  9. theEric
    • 2 years ago
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    So, that looks right..

  10. Hero
    • 2 years ago
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    cubic is in^3

  11. bumblebee3
    • 2 years ago
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    Thank you so much I get it now! =)

  12. theEric
    • 2 years ago
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    :)

  13. theEric
    • 2 years ago
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    Pfft, \([\text{in}^3]\), you're right again.

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