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espresso

I've taken some biology and chemistry courses, but I've never had the room to take physics. I'm still kind of curious about it though, and I would like to know what it's like to see if I would ever be interested in taking something later on. Does anyone know where I should start? Thanks :)

  • 8 months ago
  • 8 months ago

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  1. espresso
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    Like, what concepts to start with? Or any good websites?

    • 8 months ago
  2. theEric
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    Here's a great sight for pretty much any general concept you'd want to know for academic physics. http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/hframe.html If you like chemistry, then you might like wave particle theory or other quantum mechanics. But you have to understand basics, first. If you want to better understand how things work - with motion, light, sound, and forces - you might like physics! After studying it, you'll be able to apply it to everyday things, if you'd like. In my experience, schools will start you out with an overview of mechanics, optics, electric fields, and then magnetic fields. If it's a high school like mine, your first physics course would be mechanics. Mechanics in class are basically real world observable things, like learning what a force is, what acceleration is, what mass is. Then there's weight, inclines, projectile motion, torque, momentum, pressure and energy... The mathematical concept of vectors are important. It is strongly tied in with math. That's mostly because you deal with two or three spatial dimensions, and all properties are quantized.

    • 8 months ago
  3. theEric
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    There's a lot of math, but you're probably used to that with chemistry!

    • 8 months ago
  4. theEric
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    If you want to know the math behind everyday life, then physics is a great way to go.

    • 8 months ago
  5. ivancsc1996
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    If you have a basic knowledge of calculus, I recommend: http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/physics/8-01-physics-i-classical-mechanics-fall-1999/index.htm

    • 8 months ago
  6. Deba_001
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    I think a beginner should start with the Book ' A brief history of Time " and then " The Grand Design" both written by Stepahn Hawkins. [ huh one thing don't reverse the order]

    • 8 months ago
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