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AonZ

  • 2 years ago

I forgot how to factorise this! :( 3x^2 +2xy - 8y^2 - 8x +14y-3

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  1. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    Is this your equation? \[3x^2 +2xy - 8y^2 - 8x +14y-3\]

  2. AonZ
    • 2 years ago
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    yes

  3. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    Sorry, I was trying to get my question answered.. Anyways! What do we know? We know that the following can be factored out: \[x^2\]\[8y^2\]\[14\] I left out 3 and why because they can only be only be factored out by 1.

  4. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    Not "why". I meant "y"

  5. AonZ
    • 2 years ago
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    umm ok...

  6. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    Am I not making any sense? damn

  7. AonZ
    • 2 years ago
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    for some reason i cant factorise this question :/ i dont see taking out these common factors to be any help...

  8. AonZ
    • 2 years ago
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    i know its possible to factorise this but i ahve no idea how http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=factorize+3x%5E2+%2B2xy+-+8y%5E2+-+8x+%2B14y-3

  9. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    It will! Promise.

  10. AonZ
    • 2 years ago
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    umm, what method of factorising is this?

  11. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    REVERSE FOIL Starting with 3x^2 and 8y^2, what can they be factored into?

  12. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    3 and 1, x and x 2 and 4, y and y

  13. AonZ
    • 2 years ago
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    sorry, but i dont understand what your talking about :/

  14. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    \[3x \times x = 3x^2\]\[2y \times 4y = 8y^2\] Is that not correct?

  15. AonZ
    • 2 years ago
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    yes thats correct

  16. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    But its a negative so \[-4y \times 2y = -8y^2\]

  17. AonZ
    • 2 years ago
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    ok

  18. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    But really from that link you posted, you can take out \[(x+2y-3)\] From the this you can take out x \[3x^2 + 2xy - 8x\] From this you can factor out 2y \[2xy - 8y^2 +14y\] And lastly -3\[-3\]

  19. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    ...."you can factor out"....

  20. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    I guess you can I tried to find the greatest common factor in each, instead of reverse foil. Reverse FOIL is mostly for trinomials..

  21. AonZ
    • 2 years ago
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    mhm i tried that. Btw i never done reverse foil before so is there any other way?

  22. AonZ
    • 2 years ago
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    is it possible if you find the greatest common factor?

  23. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    Yes. I just showed you... Also some methods are: - Number of Terms - Factor Out the GCF First - Reversing FOIL - Guess and Check

  24. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    Its possible because that is what I did. For your x, you can factor out x ONLY because 3 is not a factor of 8. Also the lowest variable is x in all three. \[3x^2+2xy−8x\]

  25. AonZ
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1376184367770:dw|

  26. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    you forgot to completely factor out \[( 8x^2 - 14y)\]

  27. AonZ
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1376184611607:dw|

  28. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    Also, this equation is an alternate form of your polynomial, not your polynomial factored out... Besides did you mean to write this instead?\[x (3 x+2 y-8)+(14-8 y) y-3\]

  29. AonZ
    • 2 years ago
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    mhm yea

  30. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    Its okay :)

  31. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    Lets try this again! Take out your GCF from your polynomial.... \[3x^2 +2xy - 8y^2 - 8x +14y - 3\]

  32. AonZ
    • 2 years ago
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    not sure how...

  33. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    X, Y and your constant are separate cases. Like what I wrote if you scroll up.

  34. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    Let me try again! Here is your GCF, right? \[(x+2y − 3)\] When it comes to your x variables, only x can be factored out since 3 is not a factor of 8 even thought 2 is. Also you can't factor out x^2 because each monomial does not x^2. They all have at least one. \[3x^2 + 2xy − 8x\] Also these monomials are the only ones with an "x"

  35. AonZ
    • 2 years ago
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    still dont get how you got ur GCF...

  36. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    When it come to your y variables, you can factor out 2y because 2 is the greatest common factor. \[2xy−8y^2+14y\] And lastly for -3. It is the only constant. So when factoring, all you will use is (1) (-3) \[−3\]

  37. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    Do you know what the term GCF is? GREATEST COMMON FACTOR

  38. AonZ
    • 2 years ago
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    yea... but how did you get it...

  39. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    I thought I just showed you and explained it to you..

  40. ilfy214
    • 2 years ago
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    EXAMPLE: What are the factors and GCF for these numbers? 2 - 1, 2 3 - 1, 3 12 - 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12 The GCF for these is 1.

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