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tomsaffell

hi. I have a question that I posted here: http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/75094/pressure-change-of-water-heated-in-sealed-vessel Should I re-enter it here, or is the link enough?

  • 7 months ago
  • 7 months ago

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  1. theEric
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    I'll just paste your question here, for convenience. \(\huge\sf \color{orange}{The\ Question:}\) "I have a question regarding the relationship between temperature and pressure of water: •In a room (at one atmosphere of pressure, 20 C temp) water is added to a vessel until it is full, and then the vessel is sealed. •The vessel and the water are both at 20 degrees C •The vessel includes a pressure gauge (exposed to the water), which reads 0 psi •The water has no gasses in solution •The vessel contains no gasses Now, heat is applied to the vessel until it reaches a temperature of 101 degrees C. Question: what does the pressure gauge read? By what technique can one calculate what pressure the gauge now reads?"

    • 7 months ago
  2. theEric
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    Now, I think you want to loo at the vapor pressure of water at \(101^\circ\text C\). But I'm not sure if that applies when the container is small.. I learned about vapor pressure in chemistry. So if you don't get many responses in the physics section, maybe you can check with the chemistry section! Best of luck to you!

    • 7 months ago
  3. theEric
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    Actually - and it makes sense - the closed container is necessary for an easier model. http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/kinetic/vappre.html That link also has a table of values for water, and there's a value at \(104^\circ\text C\). Anyway... Neglecting gravity, the vapor pressure would also be the water pressure, since the pressure will be distributed equally throughout the container.

    • 7 months ago
  4. theEric
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    If you need math, Wikipedia might help! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vapour_pressure_of_water

    • 7 months ago
  5. Machida
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    Welcome to Open Study :3

    • 7 months ago
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