anonymous
  • anonymous
Help? Please and thank you! What is the y coordinate of the y−intercept of the line that passes through the points (−3, −1) and (1, 7)?
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
-3 -1 1 7|dw:1377494318035:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
You have to find the slope of the line!
anonymous
  • anonymous
Slope is...\[\frac{ RISE }{ RUN }\]

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Lagging is my life.
anonymous
  • anonymous
would that be equal to 1/2 for slope? or no?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Right:)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Well, what is my question asking for? the y coordinate?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Little confused.-.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes! To find where the line crosses the Y axes!
anonymous
  • anonymous
-2, 0? Random guess. Lol
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[y – y _{1} = m(x – x _{1})\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
Now using that formula I gave you plug in one of the Points that are given and solve for y.
anonymous
  • anonymous
-1 + 7 = m(-3 + 1)
anonymous
  • anonymous
- 7*
anonymous
  • anonymous
Not exactly...Only use one set of points and plug it into the y and x with a tiny 1...
anonymous
  • anonymous
More like... y+1= M(x+3)
anonymous
  • anonymous
And M means slope so plug that in too!
anonymous
  • anonymous
y + 1 = 1/2(x + 3)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yup, now solve for Y.
anonymous
  • anonymous
y = 1/2x + 1/2 ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes:)
anonymous
  • anonymous
This form is call slope intercept form. To find y plug in 0 for X.
anonymous
  • anonymous
y = 1/2(0) + 1/2 y = 1/2 ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
(0,1/2)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Now, this will be tricky to put in the written response, because fractions turn from 1/2 to 12. Lol. Should I just put 0.5?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Wait...before you write it lets check it...cause something doesnt seem right...
anonymous
  • anonymous
I feel like it should be a whole number, my teacher said it should be for these ones.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I think is should be (0,5)...
anonymous
  • anonymous
@mathstudent55 Maybe they know if we did anything wrong.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I figured out!
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Luigi0210
anonymous
  • anonymous
The slope is 2!
anonymous
  • anonymous
we have to redo that with the slope of 2.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Because its Y/X not X/Y.
anonymous
  • anonymous
OpenStudy is lagging for me.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Its okay! it is (0,5)
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[y+1=2(x+3)\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[y=2x+5\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Luigi0210 I really need to know if he's right. I'm so confused.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Sorry for confusing you...:(
anonymous
  • anonymous
http://www.webmath.com/_answer.php Its right, check...
anonymous
  • anonymous
Only if OpenStudy was a real person...
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
So you're just looking for the y-coordinate of the y intercept?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes.
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Well you know that the y-intercept is when x=0 right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes, but now I don't even know what the slope is anymore. 1/2 or 2 or 5 lol.
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Slope is: \[m=\frac{y2-y1}{x2-x1}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
-3, -1 1, 7
anonymous
  • anonymous
-1 - 7 ------ -3 - 1 ?
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Just plug them in and solve. and either way works, you get the same answer
anonymous
  • anonymous
-8 -- -4 ?
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Yup, making the slope 2. Now we plug that information into the point-slope formula: y-y1=m(x-x1)
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Open was right so far, except for the slope
anonymous
  • anonymous
y - 1 = 2(x - 7) ?
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Yea, not just distribute.
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
*now
anonymous
  • anonymous
y = 2x - 13?
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Yup!
anonymous
  • anonymous
Now what?
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Now we find the y-intercept Meaning that we plug in where ever there is an x. This will give us the y value we are looking for.
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
*0
anonymous
  • anonymous
What do we use for x? What number?
anonymous
  • anonymous
0 = 2x - 3?
anonymous
  • anonymous
-13......let me type please OpenStudy please...
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Ah, plug 0 in for x, not y
anonymous
  • anonymous
y = 2(0) - 13 y = -13?
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Yup, and that's it Mikeyy :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
I feel like that would be one weird y-intercept from where the two dots are on a graph..
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Your ordered pair is (-13, 0)
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
*(0, -13)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Alright thanks :P
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Mikeyy..
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Lol. Answer wasn't -13 but I still got a 88. and I have a chance to get a 90 with my written response...
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Yes I was about to say that.. sorry buddy :( I just realized that we used the wrong points for the point-slope formula.
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
The answer was actually (0, 5) and the equation was y=2x+5
anonymous
  • anonymous
It's fine. I had to get over a 60 and I did. So, I'm happy. I need to get off OP before it screws me another time. thanks again
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Alright, and you're welcome :)

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