anonymous
  • anonymous
Questions are attached
Geometry
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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katieb
  • katieb
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
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anonymous
  • anonymous
Here's an idea: ask *how* to do it, not what the answer is.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm not asking for the answer. I would like to know how to solve the problems.

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theEric
  • theEric
To both of you, I was thinking about the same thing! @Anickyan , to be precise, nothing was asked yet... @Amarie31 , similarly, you did not ask anything. Normally people will see a problem and maybe walk you through it. I think the best way to learn, when there isn't a community to help, is to formulate specific questions, like, "what is the degree of a polynomial?" Or others. Sometimes you have to delve into the problem just to find what to ask, and you learn how to do it in the process! That's great! And for interactive help, OpenStudy is here :) So, where are you having a problem? If you're like I am/was, you'll look at it and say "the whole thing." But now I more usually try to make sure I understand the question thoroughly - every word - before I decide I don't know what to do. Do you have a specific problem, or do you want a hint?
theEric
  • theEric
I only have one half hour to help right now!
anonymous
  • anonymous
I don't understand problem 53
theEric
  • theEric
So, maybe I can help you understand everything. Do you know what the degree of a polynomial is?
anonymous
  • anonymous
No I do not know
theEric
  • theEric
Okay! Well, you find the term where the variable(s) have the highest powers combined. I assume you're just using one variable, so the "order" is the same number as the highest power. Well, a polynomial has many terms (added/subtracted pieces) and the varibles have different exponents, like \(2x^2+x+4\). So, the \(2x^2\) has the highest power, \(2\). So the order is \(2\), so second order.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Alright that makes sense
theEric
  • theEric
Now, these polynomials can make funky curves, like |dw:1377538217745:dw|and stuff like that.
theEric
  • theEric
You want to know what order the polynomial CANNOT BE to have just three points on the axis. The maximum number of times a function can cross the \(x\)-axis depends somewhat on the order. If you have a first order, it is like \(ax^1\pm b\). That is a line, and will cross once. If you have a second order, it is like \(ax^2\pm bx\pm c\). That could cross twice. 3 could cross three times, 4 could cross four, and so on. Okay?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes I understand
theEric
  • theEric
Okay! So, your polynomial crosses 3 times. Could maybe have more bumps, but crosses just 3. So the polynomial must have at least what order to make at least 3 crosses?
anonymous
  • anonymous
3
theEric
  • theEric
Right. So, if you order is \(n\), and the order must be 3 or more, so \(n\ge 3\), what cannot be true?
anonymous
  • anonymous
2
theEric
  • theEric
Right! I have to go. Take care!
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thanks so much
theEric
  • theEric
You're welcome!
theEric
  • theEric
Now, notice how we broke down the problem. You might not have known that the max number of crosses is the order, but now you do! :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
You helped a lot!

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