anonymous
  • anonymous
"Program testing can be a very effective way to show the presence of bugs, but it is hopelessly inadequate for showing their absence." -- Edsger Dijkstra Can somebody explain this quote ?
Computer Science
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
rsmith6559
  • rsmith6559
A program will crash if it has bugs, but if it runs it's not a guarantee that it's correct. It can still have bugs in it, just harder to find.
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
Prove to me that there are no invisible people. The argument is, "I never saw one!" Well... they are invisible. So finding all the invisible people in the world is a lot like finding all the bugs in a complex program. Sure, you can spread dust on the floor in some places, spray mist in the air in others, and try as you can. There is just too much to cover to test everything for invisible people.... or bugs in program, the invisible people of the computers. On top of that, every program made these days uses libraries or at least runs on an operating system not made by perfect people. A clean program in the lab may have a bad reaction on a buggy machine in the world Look at how much it took to reproduce this bug: http://www.ccnr.org/fatal_dose.html Down there in the text it talks about hours and hours of work when knowing what they were looking for! Imagine if you did not know? You put the program through the paces, tossed in some odd values, and kicked things around the room a lot. Nothing too bad happens, so you patch the few bits you find and ship out your radiation machine. And then it kills a few dozen people.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.