anonymous
  • anonymous
Given F(x) shown below, complete the equation for the inverse of F(x). If necessary, use the slash mark (/) for the division symbol.
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[F(x)=\frac{ 2x }{ 7+4 }\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[f ^{-1}(y)=\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Luigi0210 @Anickyan i really lost on this problem

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Oh, fun one :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
\(y = \frac{2x}{7 + 4}\) solve for \(x\)
anonymous
  • anonymous
x+2/11?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Nope. \(2x\) means \(2 * x\)
anonymous
  • anonymous
so 2+x/11
anonymous
  • anonymous
is the^ right
anonymous
  • anonymous
No. Do you want me to keep on explaining or give you the answer?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Anickyan
anonymous
  • anonymous
what very u think is best for me
anonymous
  • anonymous
I think explaining it the best thing. I can give you some easy tasks to do: http://www.sosmath.com/algebra/solve/solve0/solve0.html They start easy, and get more and more difficult.
anonymous
  • anonymous
damn thats really hard
anonymous
  • anonymous
hey can u help
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Anickyan @Luigi0210
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
@Anickyan Already explained it..
anonymous
  • anonymous
i keep on getting 2+x/11
anonymous
  • anonymous
i give up its hard
anonymous
  • anonymous
@mathstudent55 can u check mt answer
DebbieG
  • DebbieG
You have \(F(x)=\dfrac{ 2x }{ 7+4 }\) which is really just \(F(x)=\dfrac{ 2x }{ 11 }\) Replace the F(x) with y: \(y=\dfrac{ 2x }{ 11 }\) Now solve it for x.
DebbieG
  • DebbieG
You should NOT get getting \(y=2+\dfrac{ x }{ 11 }\) In fact, you should be getting x={some stuff involving y|
kropot72
  • kropot72
The inverse of f(x) should be written as \[f ^{-1} (x)\]
kropot72
  • kropot72
So the question is stated incorrectly.
DebbieG
  • DebbieG
@kropot72 , I agree but we had a big thread about this yesterday, lol. @romanortiz65 's instructor apparently uses different notation.
anonymous
  • anonymous
x-2/11?
DebbieG
  • DebbieG
DebbieG
  • DebbieG
@romanortiz65 you have \(y=\dfrac{ 2x }{ 11 }\) And you need to solve for x. what is STEP 1. Tell the first thing you will do.
anonymous
  • anonymous
switch y and x
DebbieG
  • DebbieG
That isn't how you "solve for x". You solve for x by isolating x, getting it all alone.
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh x+2/11
DebbieG
  • DebbieG
Again, you should have x ALONE. and it should be = something. I'm not sure why you are giving responses that are not equations, and that don't isolate x. x is not involved in any sums/differences, so it isn't likely that you need any sums/differences in the inverse.
DebbieG
  • DebbieG
Look at the equation this way: \(y=\dfrac{ 2x }{ 11 }\) is the same as \(y=x\cdot\dfrac{ 2 }{ 11 }\) Now how do you solve that for x? How can you get that x= all alone on the RHS of the equation?
DebbieG
  • DebbieG
HINT: IF \(t=r\cdot\dfrac{ 5 }{ 13 }\) THEN \(\dfrac{ 13 }{ 5 }\cdot t=r\)
anonymous
  • anonymous
-x -x both sides
anonymous
  • anonymous
@DebbieG
anonymous
  • anonymous
y=13/5?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Luigi0210 check answer
anonymous
  • anonymous
@hba check anwer please
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Where are your variables..?
anonymous
  • anonymous
can u just please just give me the answer im running super late for school please
DebbieG
  • DebbieG
You have \(y=x\cdot\dfrac{ 2 }{ 11 }\) Read my hint above. You can multiply both sides by the reciprocal of 2/11:
DebbieG
  • DebbieG
\(y=x\cdot\dfrac{ 2 }{ 11 }\) \(\dfrac{ 11 }{ 2 }\cdot y=x\cdot\dfrac{ 2 }{ 11 }\cdot\dfrac{ 11 }{ 2 }\) What do you get?
DebbieG
  • DebbieG
@incognito, if you read above and follow the link to the prior question, you'll see the explanation about his instructor wanting the inverse as a function of y, not of x.
anonymous
  • anonymous
x x 22/22
DebbieG
  • DebbieG
@romanortiz65 I don't even know what you mean by that. where is your y?? Where is your = sign?
anonymous
  • anonymous
just give me final answer running late for my senior picture
anonymous
  • anonymous
please
DebbieG
  • DebbieG
Oh, ok.... I think you mean that's the RHS?? I guess so. But not sure why you have an extra x.
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Dude.. it's just one question. It's not like you're gonna die or fail if you don't answer it.
DebbieG
  • DebbieG
I pretty much did. Just simplify that RHS above and you will have x=???
anonymous
  • anonymous
y=22/22
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
Well then..
DebbieG
  • DebbieG
HOW does.... \(\dfrac{ 11 }{ 2 }\cdot y=x\cdot\dfrac{ 2 }{ 11 }\cdot\dfrac{ 11 }{ 2 }\) Simplify to y=22/22??? 1. Where did the fraction go from the LHS?? 2. Where did the x go from the RHS?? 3. 22/22 is not simplified. It can be made simpler!! C'mon, man, you are psyching yourself out. You're so convinced that you can't do this that you aren't thinking it through.
anonymous
  • anonymous
11/11
anonymous
  • anonymous
1
DebbieG
  • DebbieG
\[\dfrac{\cancel 2 }{ \cancel {11} }\cdot\dfrac{\cancel {11} }{\cancel 2 }=1\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
i got this one wrong ;( didnt pass my test
anonymous
  • anonymous
@DebbieG the ?s u helped me were wrongg

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.