Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

theEric

  • 2 years ago

I used Wolfram Alpha to see that \(\int x^{-1} dx=\ln\left|x\right|+C\), even though I don't understand why. But what about \(\int f(x)^{-1}dx\)? Wolfram Alpha couldn't come up with a formula. So, is this a problem when trying to solve with substitution?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. Dido525
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    That's basically the integral of 1/f(x) . There are many possibilities depending on what f(x) is.

  2. Dido525
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    you may have to use techniques other than substitution possibly.

  3. Dido525
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    For instance if f(x) is 1+x^2 than we have the integral of 1/(1+x^2) which is arctan(x) + c

  4. dan815
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    |dw:1377755678612:dw|

  5. theEric
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Okay! So, if the function is know, then we just try to integrate it. Thank you!

  6. theEric
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I'm going to ask about the specific problem in another post. This one is done, thanks! :)

  7. Dido525
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    Allright :) .

  8. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy