anonymous
  • anonymous
Which of the following has the largest I\(_2\)? (Transition metals lose their \(s\) electrons before the \(d\) electrons) K Ca Sc Fe
Chemistry
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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anonymous
  • anonymous
@Preetha
Preetha
  • Preetha
I2? Second ionization energy?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes

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anonymous
  • anonymous
I leave now, but please leave a response, thanks
Preetha
  • Preetha
Write the electron configuration of all the atoms. Then see which electron will be removed in the second ionization reaction. Then think about which electron would be the hardest to remove. I think you will see it. For example, K has to lose its s electron first and then it will lose an electron from a closed inner orbital, the p. Now do the same for the rest of the atoms.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay, I'll try that... thank you!
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[K:~ 1s^1~ 2s^2~ 2p^6~ 3s^2 ~3p^6~4s^1\]\[Ca:~1s^1~ 2s^2~ 2p^6~ 3s^2 ~3p^6 ~4s^2\]\[Sc:~1s^1 ~2s^2 ~2p^6 ~3s^2~ 3p^6 ~4s^2~ 3d^1\]\[Fe:~1s^1~ 2s^2 ~2p^6 ~3s^2~ 3p^6~ 4s^2~ 3d^6\] Would it be K?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Preetha
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Australopithecus got anything?
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
Pretty sure Ionization energy is related to effective nuclear charge (electronegativity)
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes i believe so
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
Ca is more electronegative than K, (it is closer to the right the periodic table)
anonymous
  • anonymous
yea but it says SECOND Ionization energy so.. idk :\ im confused
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
Isn't there a law where available orbitals are filled with 1 electron before they are filled with 2
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
I think you are over thinking it
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
Anyways if something has a strong affinity for electrons (it is electronegative) it should take even more energy to pull the next electron off it
anonymous
  • anonymous
yea but we're talking about pulling the second electron off
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
let me read up on orbitals, I haven't done this stuff in ages
anonymous
  • anonymous
and wouldnt K use the most energy since its stable after the first electron being removed so it would take a lot more energy to remove a second one
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
what is the point of this question?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Which of the following has the largest I2? (Transition metals lose their s electrons before the d electrons) K Ca Sc Fe they want to know which element would have the largest second ionization energy
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
the more you go toward to the right, the ionization energy increases. so it's down to up left to right and diagonal right
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
there's a chart of a whole periodic table on this one. let me pull it up for you
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
I posted it I'm pretty sure @nincompoop
anonymous
  • anonymous
i answered Fe since its farthest to the right as would follow the rule but my teacher said to try again cuz that was wrong..so i honestly dont even know
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
that is because d orbitals dont hold electrons very well, wish I knew why tbh
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
It is why metals are conductive though
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay so Sc and Fe are ruled out, yea?
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
any way you can just link the index?
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
This looks like an interesting book, I really wish I could take inorganic chemistry and structure and bonding
anonymous
  • anonymous
tha pages end at 110..
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
you have to look at the displayed page on the book itself, don't follow how it shows on your browser or adobe. I took every chapter individually so it is easier for people to download or view
anonymous
  • anonymous
yea the individual page numbers end at 110
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
okay look at the upper right and upper left hand corners of the book, it tells you the actual page in the book itself.
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
I just got home, so let me settle down and I will help you later.
anonymous
  • anonymous
nin im not stupid...the header on the last page says: 110- Chapter Two Atomic Structure and Periodicity
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
Thanks nincompoop this is a great source
anonymous
  • anonymous
it is :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
umm...i think i got it, I'll put some more thought to it and ask my instructor again later Thanks guys!
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
|dw:1377833127779:dw|
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
Well p orbitals are higher energy than s orbitals
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
Which I should have remembered durp
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
|dw:1377833460330:dw|
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
|dw:1377833590676:dw|
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
s orbitals are closer to the nucleus than p orbitals, http://www.chembook.co.uk/fig2-3.jpg
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
|dw:1377833799516:dw|
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
These orbitals are just calculations of where you would most likely find the electron, based on the uncertainty principle.
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
I know the order of the orbitals.
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
so it would be potassium
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
what would really help is to read the whole chapter. either of the first link or the last link. you will get the whole picture, and it will help a lot in terms of their properties during bonding.
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
You are right, it seems interesting, I will probably read it right now ha Initial configuration of K 1s1 2s2 2p6 3s2 3p6 4s1 First electron withdrawn 1s1 2s2 2p6 3s2 3p5 4s1 second electron withdrawn 1s1 2s2 2p6 3s2 3p4 4s1 is this correct? It has been forever since I have done these
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
It sucks how little I remember from gen chem
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
lol how many joules does it require to remove one from the p block?
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
off hand I have no clue, I just remember hunds rule states that all higher orbitals should be filled with 1 electron before with 2 electrons
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
I may be mistaken I took gen chem 4 years ago
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
I know p orbitals hold onto electrons weaker than s orbitals. Its why organic compounds with greater s character are more acidic
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
or rather carbon atoms with greater s character are more acidic
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
yeah that's in terms of filling the space, but that has little to do with ionization. for the ionization you follow from right to left of the configuration so for a K, the first Ionization is the 4s1
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
So hunds rule just dictates the optimal electron configuration of an atom?
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
Hund's Rule is just a description of the behavior in terms of the Pauli Principle.
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
oh oh, I need to read that chapter I still dont really understand ha
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
so it would be Ca because the Sc and Fe d orbitals shield the protons, K only has one 4s1 electron to remove whereas Ca has 2 4s electrons to remove
Australopithecus
  • Australopithecus
ok ok downloading it now thanks for posting it :D
Preetha
  • Preetha
It would be K. The second electron is going from a complete orbital and that would require a lot of energy. So I2 would be pretty high. The transition metal orbitals are pretty close in energy so I2 would be pretty small.
nincompoop
  • nincompoop

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