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tigeranime

  • one year ago

An original rectangle has a length of 14 and a width of 12 . What happens to the area if the new width is double the original width? Verify your answer

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  1. OpenSessame
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1377849376249:dw|

  2. OpenSessame
    • one year ago
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    \[Old Triangle: 14*12*(1/2)\]

  3. OpenSessame
    • one year ago
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    \[NewTriangle: 14*24*(1/2)\]

  4. tigeranime
    • one year ago
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    i dont under stand

  5. OpenSessame
    • one year ago
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    To find the area of a triangle you do width*height*(1/2)

  6. AkashdeepDeb
    • one year ago
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    @OpenSessame He/She is talking about a Rectangle. :)

  7. OpenSessame
    • one year ago
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    Im on idiot...0,o

  8. OpenSessame
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1377849910366:dw|

  9. ⒶArchie☁✪
    • one year ago
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    We start with L=14 and W=12 and now we are doubling width, so it's 24 what would be new area with l=4 and w=24?

  10. ⒶArchie☁✪
    • one year ago
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    do you recall how to find area of rectangle in general? what would be 24 times 14 then?

  11. tigeranime
    • one year ago
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    my mind it blank i dont under stand

  12. ⒶArchie☁✪
    • one year ago
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    Ok well, that is the only way I can help. If you're unable to understand my explanation then sorry no can do.

  13. tigeranime
    • one year ago
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    ok thx i will try to work on it more and see what i can come up woith thanks for you help

  14. tigeranime
    • one year ago
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    with*

  15. OpenSessame
    • one year ago
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    Ill help you out..

  16. MENTALFRICTION
    • one year ago
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    Just let the bass cannon kick it... JK :P sorry for saying something unrelated. XD

  17. OpenSessame
    • one year ago
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    http://www.aaamath.com/geo78_x3.htm Remember base is just another word for width

  18. ⒶArchie☁✪
    • one year ago
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    Well, we started with dimensions 14 and 12 we found it's area to be 168 then we doubled width so we have 14 and 24 and the area of that was 336. if you compare both areas; 168 and 336 one is 2 times the other, 336 is 2 times larger than 168. so by doubling the width, our new area is also doubled. Do you understand it now? @tigeranime

  19. tigeranime
    • one year ago
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    yep thank

  20. ⒶArchie☁✪
    • one year ago
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    doubling width also led to doubling the area, no worries. :)

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