austinL
  • austinL
Find the general solution of the given differential equation, and use it to determine how solutions behave as \(t\rightarrow\infty\) \(y\prime + (1/t)y = 3\cos(2t)\) , \(t>0\)
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
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austinL
  • austinL
@amistre64 Would you mind giving some guidance. I think I am probably making this more difficult than it should be.
amistre64
  • amistre64
maybe in like an hour ill have more time to look at this
austinL
  • austinL
Ok, thanks very much!

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amistre64
  • amistre64
i know the homogenous is: c/t
amistre64
  • amistre64
y = A(t)~t^(-1) y' = A'(t)~t^(-1) - A(t) t^(-2) ; let the A'(t) = 0 to account for the homogenous solution -A(t) t^(-2) = 3cos(2t) would most likely cover the particular ... is a thought.
austinL
  • austinL
Ok, the general solution of a problem is y=........ right? I believe we would have to do the \(\mu(t)\) thing right?
amistre64
  • amistre64
im not adept at the u(t) thing .... never tried to work it like that
amistre64
  • amistre64
the general solution would be: y = yh + yp in this case yh = C/t yp can be made with guesses, or by using variation of parameters or a wronskian if memory serves
amistre64
  • amistre64
something like a guess of: yp = A cos(2t) + B sin(2t) is the usual run i believe
austinL
  • austinL
In my notes I think I just found something that may be helpful. \(\dfrac{dy}{dt}+ay=g(t)\) \(y=e^{-at}\int e^{at}g(t)dt+Ce^{-at}\) And now that I have it all written out, this particular formula only works if a is a constant. Darn it.
austinL
  • austinL
Ok ok. I think I found an example in my book that is somewhat similar to this problem \(2y\prime +ty=2\) Which can be written as, \(y\prime +\dfrac{t}{2}y=1\) Then using the \(\mu(t)\) method it says that, \(\mu(t)=e^{\int p(t)dt}=e^{\int \frac{t}{2}dt}=e^{\frac{t^2}{4}}\) Could I do something similar here?
amistre64
  • amistre64
im just not that proficient or confident in the u(t) method to validate it
austinL
  • austinL
Ok, using words I can understand :P, would you mind walking me through your method and see if it is any better?
amistre64
  • amistre64
in my head .... i something like this: y = A/t y/t = A/t^2 + y' = A'/t - A/t^2 ------------------ 3 cos(2t) = A'/t A' = 3t cos(2t) int A' = 3/4 (2t sin(2t) + cos(2t)) which is apprently off by that errant "t" bythe sin according to the wolf :)
amistre64
  • amistre64
they say 2 sin(2t) + cos(2t)/t
austinL
  • austinL
I am sorry, I feel rather dumb right now, but I am having problems wrapping my head around this for some reason.
austinL
  • austinL
@Psymon Hate to randomly tag, but others have said that you may be able to help?
abb0t
  • abb0t
This is a first order linear ODE. Start by obtaining your integrating factor.
abb0t
  • abb0t
Once you get your integrating factor, distribute it across the ODE. You will see that you get product rule on the right hand side (guaranteed. unless you do your math wrong).
austinL
  • austinL
Ok, so I have: \(y\prime +(\dfrac{1}{t})y=3\cos(2t)\) Our integrating factor multiplied across: \((\mu(t))y\prime+(\dfrac{1}{t})(\mu(t))y=3(\mu(t))\cos(2t)\) As I stated earlier, \(\mu(t)=e^{\int p(t)dt}=e^{\int \frac{1}{t}dt}=e^{\ln|t|}\) Which I believe means that \(\mu(t)=t\) ?
abb0t
  • abb0t
Yes, that is correct, \(\mu\)(t)= t Now, distribute \(\mu\)(t) across your ODE.
abb0t
  • abb0t
You get: \(ty' +y = 3tcos(2t)\)
abb0t
  • abb0t
Notice that your left hand side is nothing more than product rule! So you have: \([ty]' = 3tcos(2t)\)
abb0t
  • abb0t
Integrate both sides with respect to \(t\) to solve for \(y\). The left side you have \(\int [yt]'dt\) = t(y(t)), now i WILL LET you integrate the right hand side. You will be using parts.
austinL
  • austinL
I am finding \(\int 3t\cos(2t)dt\) ?
abb0t
  • abb0t
Yes, sir.
austinL
  • austinL
I see why I am integrating this side :P
austinL
  • austinL
\(=\dfrac{3}{4}(2t\sin(2t)+\cos(2t))+C\) Does this look correct?
anonymous
  • anonymous
am I too late to this party?
abb0t
  • abb0t
You can take over @oldrin.bataku I thought this was algebra 2 but it's not! So, bye.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Find the general solution of the given differential equation, and use it to determine how solutions behave as t→∞ $$y'+\frac1ty=3\cos(2t)$$Recognize (hopefully by inspection) there is an obvious integrating factor \(\mu=t\) to use here:$$ty'+y=3\cos2t\\(ty)'=3\cos2t$$Integrating both sides we get:$$\int\frac{d}{dt}[ty]\,dt=\int 3\cos2t\,dt\\ty=3\int\cos2t\,dt=\frac32\sin(2t)+C\\y(t)=\frac3{2t}\sin2t+\frac{C}t$$
austinL
  • austinL
I believe you made an error in your second line of LaTeX, should it not be \(3t\cos(2t)\)?
anonymous
  • anonymous
lol very good point
austinL
  • austinL
And may I ask, where does the "y" go on the left side?
austinL
  • austinL
Ok, so right now I am at \(ty=\dfrac{3}{4}(2t\sin(2t)+\cos(2t))\) Then do you just divide by t, and it is all good?
austinL
  • austinL
+C on end.... oops
austinL
  • austinL
+C on end.... oops
abb0t
  • abb0t
C'mon gaiz...
abb0t
  • abb0t
can't we all just be on the same tangent plane for once :-)
anonymous
  • anonymous
i prefer jets
austinL
  • austinL
Ok, I think I have the answer. \(y(t)=\dfrac{3(2t\sin(2t)+\cos(2t))}{4t}+\dfrac{C}{t}\) Does this look even remotely correct?
abb0t
  • abb0t
Ok mr.Fancy pants.
abb0t
  • abb0t
and yes, that is correct.
austinL
  • austinL
WOOOOO!!!!!!! Then as \(t\rightarrow \infty\), does it approach zero? As there are t's in both denominators?
abb0t
  • abb0t
Take the limit and find out.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@austinL all of $$\sin2t,\cos2t,C$$are bounded while \(t\) is not so yes
austinL
  • austinL
When I take the limit, I arrive at \(\dfrac{-3}{2}~to~\dfrac{3}{2}\)
anonymous
  • anonymous
that's because wolfram spit out lim sup/inf
abb0t
  • abb0t
smh @wolfram
austinL
  • austinL
Zero then, go with my first answer?
austinL
  • austinL
I do believe I will work out another problem, close this and post the question and my solution and see if I am correct. Would you guys mind checking that in a few?

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