shrutipande9
  • shrutipande9
In eukaryotic DNA replication, RNAse H removes the primers and then which DNA polymerase adds the nucleotides in these places? i need this ans urgently.
Biology
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katieb
  • katieb
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aaronq
  • aaronq
I'm pretty sure its DNA polymerase I
shrutipande9
  • shrutipande9
umm isnt dat the one in prokaryotes? actually what i am reading is all about DNA pol alpha beta delta etc. isnt it one of these pols?
aaronq
  • aaronq
"The different DNA polymerases thus play distinct roles at the replication fork (Figure 5.7). In prokaryotic cells, polymerase III is the major replicative polymerase, functioning in the synthesis both of the leading strand of DNA and of Okazaki fragments by the extension of RNA primers. Polymerase I then removes RNA primers and fills the gaps between Okazaki fragments. In eukaryotic cells, however, two DNA polymerases are required to do what in E. coli is accomplished by polymerase III alone. Polymerase α is found in a complex with primase, and it appears to function in conjunction with primase to synthesize short RNA-DNA fragments during lagging strand synthesis. Polymerase δ can then synthesize both the leading and lagging strands, acting to extend the RNA-DNA primers initially synthesized by the polymerase α-primase complex. In addition, polymerase δ can take the place of E. coli polymerase I in filling the gaps between Okazaki fragments following primer removal." http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK9940/ so according to this, it can be either DNA pol I or pol \(\delta\)

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aaronq
  • aaronq
though this book in kinda old.
shrutipande9
  • shrutipande9
okay thnx :) and does pol delta act on leading and lagging strand? (replacement of primer)
aaronq
  • aaronq
yep, "Polymerase δ can then synthesize both the leading and lagging strands" in the same paragraph. You might want to check a newer book, though.
shrutipande9
  • shrutipande9
@ aaronq thanks a ton!!!!

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