anonymous
  • anonymous
Determine the infinite limit? (I have to present it in class. can I have an explanation please). lim + x + 2 x->-3 ------- = x + 3
Calculus1
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
chestercat
  • chestercat
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
+ x approach -3
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[ \lim_{x\to -3^+}\frac{x+2}{x+3}= \]
zzr0ck3r
  • zzr0ck3r
@micalg do you understant?

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

zzr0ck3r
  • zzr0ck3r
well as we aprroac-3 from the right we will have negative on top, and positive on bottom, but the bottom will tend to 0 as we get close so we have -/+ but the top is a constant, so limit = -infinity
anonymous
  • anonymous
Fill out a chart: |dw:1378080013208:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
yah I think I started to
anonymous
  • anonymous
Also you can use epsilon delta to prove it: \[ \forall N, \exists \delta: \\ \forall x \quad 0
zzr0ck3r
  • zzr0ck3r
it does not converge @wio so you would need\[\forall \space M,\exists\epsilon>0\space st\space |x-(-3)|<\delta \implies f(x)>M\]
zzr0ck3r
  • zzr0ck3r
and its not N, unless you are saying that N is in R, but we never say that...
anonymous
  • anonymous
This is a one sided infinite limit. It has a particular definition. I might have made a minor error.
zzr0ck3r
  • zzr0ck3r
if it has a limit, this does not.
anonymous
  • anonymous
But there should not be any absolute value signs for this type of limit.
zzr0ck3r
  • zzr0ck3r
evrey definition I know of limits has abs value...
anonymous
  • anonymous
The one-sided limit does exist in this case.
anonymous
  • anonymous
There are about 12 variations on the definition of a limit to account for things like one-sided limits, infinite limits, limits of sequences, etc.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Actually much more than 12 variations. Anyway the general definition takes a lot of math that is not introduced in calculus to write out well.
zzr0ck3r
  • zzr0ck3r
its not that bad, I was simply saying that you are forcings things to be smaller than a natural number, it should be all real numbers
anonymous
  • anonymous
I didn't mean to say anything about natural or real numbers.
zzr0ck3r
  • zzr0ck3r
so it would be \[\forall M , \exists\delta>0, st\space -\deltam\]
zzr0ck3r
  • zzr0ck3r
we are showing divergence so f(x)
anonymous
  • anonymous
I intially said \(f(x) < N \) is because before you said \(-\infty\).
anonymous
  • anonymous
But since it is going towards \(\infty\) then yes, in this case you'd do \(f(x)>N\)

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.