anonymous
  • anonymous
factor 27^6s+64y^3t 24x^2a-6
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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chestercat
  • chestercat
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anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm not sure what your question is. Can you use the equation editor to clear it up?
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[27x ^{6s}+64y ^{3t}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
There is no variable that can be factored out so look at the coefficients and see if they have a common factor.

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anonymous
  • anonymous
\[24x ^{2a}-6\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
In the expression \(27x ^{6s}+64y ^{3t}\) the coefficients are perfect cubes. You can figure that out by prime factorization.
anonymous
  • anonymous
so i dont know how to do that
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm not sure what the question is asking for. Is this on a computer program?
anonymous
  • anonymous
its asking to factor
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm sorry, maybe someone else can help you.
anonymous
  • anonymous
The first expression looks like it could be the sum of two cubes. [3^(2s)]^3 + [4y^t]^3 Then it could be broken down further, according to a^3 + b^3=(a+b)(a^2 - 2ab + b^2)
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok but what would i do with the s and t
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Julian101 wouldn't that mean the s exponent needs to be raised to the third power?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Nevermind, it doesn't.
anonymous
  • anonymous
When an exponent is raised to a power, you multiply the exponents.
anonymous
  • anonymous
but dont you do that when x and y are the same
anonymous
  • anonymous
its asking to factor
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm thinking that "a" would be 3^(2s) and "b" would be 4y^t. So (3^(2s) + 4y^t) (9^(4s) - 2(3^(2s))(4y^t) + 16y^(2t))
anonymous
  • anonymous
could u write that withe the equation thingie
anonymous
  • anonymous
I can't seem to get the equation writer to work on my end. It hasn't worked for me in several days, and what the others have written isn't showing up in the equation symbols either, so it's very hard to read.
anonymous
  • anonymous
\((3x^{2s} + 4y^t) (9x^{4s} - 2(3^{2s})(4y^t) + 16y^{2t})\) I think this is Julian's expression.
anonymous
  • anonymous
then would that be like the final answer
anonymous
  • anonymous
I added an x after the 3 and 9, I should have added an x after the 3 in the middle term as well.
anonymous
  • anonymous
\((3x^{2s} + 4y^t) (9x^{4s} - 2(3x^{2s})(4y^t) + 16y^{2t})\)
anonymous
  • anonymous
As to that being the final answer, I don't know. Maybe those middle terms need to be multiplied.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I think I made a mistake, the 2 should be removed from the middle of the second expression in brackets.
anonymous
  • anonymous
no there is something wrong. \[a ^{3}+b ^{3}=\left( a+b \right)\left( a ^{2}-ab+b ^{2} \right)\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
a^3 +b^3 = (a+b) (a^2 -ab +b^2) i.e., there is NOT a 2 in front of the ab
anonymous
  • anonymous
Sorry about that. Other than that, I think that should be final, as I don't think it can be reduced further.
anonymous
  • anonymous
For the second question, factor out 6, so now you have 6(4x^2a -1) then break down the expression in brackets = 6(2x^a - 1)(2x^a + 1)

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