anonymous
  • anonymous
I understand that this is an independent self-paced course, but is there anywhere that lists the recommended pace for completion (as it was originally taught)? I attended MIT a loong time ago for a few semesters so I'm familiar with the amount of material. I just can't seem to find a proposed schedule, like number of lectures and recitations per week. How many days into the course was the first problem set due, etc.
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chestercat
  • chestercat
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anonymous
  • anonymous
Somewhere they have a statement that students should expect to spend at least 150 hours on the course. Based on my experience I would say that's a bare minimum, even for someone who's quite good at math. One thing to keep in mind is that this is an adaptation of a course that was aimed at MIT students, who have an extraordinarily high level of talent. It's loaded with content -- more than you would get in two semesters of calculus at most schools. You should plan on a significant time commitment to complete the course. The time will be well rewarded.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Do you know where the break is between what is normally covered in calc 1 and calc 2 at most schools? I took an overview of calculus class and calculus I with my bachelor's degree and now am going back to school. I'm trying to brush up before going back to school and taking calc 2 at a local university.
anonymous
  • anonymous
It won't necessarily be the same at all schools, so you might want to see if there's a syllabus available for the course you're planing to take (and for the course that precedes it). That said, if you work through the first three units of this course you'll have likely covered everything that would be covered in a typical calc 1 course and more. I'm guessing that for most schools you could skip most or all the material on approximation (or at least quadratic approximation) in Part 2A, and you probably wouldn't need Part 3C. On the other hand, some calc courses include substantial work on analytic geometry (definitions and equations for conic sections with transpositions and so forth) but this course does not (understandably, since it crams so much into one seriously intense semester).

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