anonymous
  • anonymous
HI, during my high school, I didn't study physics,chemistry and biology. Do you think i can self learning electrical engineering? (I'm interest with this subjects) thank you.
MIT 6.01SC Introduction to Electrical Engineering and Computer Science I
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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anonymous
  • anonymous
The computer science part of the course doesn't require any of those subjects. I think some physics would be helpful for the electrical engineering portion, but I don't know because I haven't started it yet :) Good luck
JayH
  • JayH
Sure you can, If I can. You can do anything, lol
anonymous
  • anonymous
You can get pretty far with the video lectures MIT has made available with out such a background. Chemistry and biology have very little to do with EE. The chemistry would only come up if you're trying to design batteries or doing something with semiconductor fabrication and the later is an advanced course anyway. You're math background is far more important--differential and integral calculus, differential equations, and linear algebra and many starting EE undergraduates will not have taken calculus in high school. The math isn't vital to learning a programming language but it does become important since many of the assigned problems will require some level of mathematical proficiency to solve. All four math courses above though DO become important when you take circuit theory which requires a certain level of mathematical study and two semesters of physics will be prerequisite for that course. Honestly, EE is pretty difficult because of the math but that's why engineers make the big bucks (and being tied directly into product development). MIT teaches Python in their lower level courses which is very easy to start programming with while remaining powerful but Berkeley on the west coast and UT Austin teach C instead. Learning Python will teach you how to program, implement algorithms, etc., but an engineer should really know C++ and especially C for things like embedded development and to write applications for Linux and to create applications for the financial sector. Logic design is another basic discipline that EE's should know and using an HDL like Verilog that lets you design a physical circuit using something similar to a programming language. Signals and Systems is needed as a basis for understanding how to analyze and design communication networks and devices that receive signals on these networks (think cell phones). All of these things are difficult but engineers make great salaries and this field empowers you to make useful things unlike any other field of study. It is not uncommon for engineers to stop working for a couple years while they work on products for their startup or whatever. EE empowers you like nothing else so it is very worth it despite whatever hurdles you may have to overcome. You will need a degree to get a job in this field (Jeri Ellsworth withstanding) but without one you can still make very cool things and potentially make money doing that (more so programming but hardware design is still possible). The freshman EE books that I like the best would be "Digital Design and Computer Architecture" by Harris, "Foundations of Digital and Analog Circuits" by Argarwal (he teaches the circuit theory course on OCW), "C++ From the Ground Up" by Schildt, and "Digital Systems Design with FPGAs and CPLDs" by Grout. Also, google MIT's 6.01 course page--the current one, not the one on OCW in order to get the updated copy of their 6.01 Course Notes. Good luck!

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anonymous
  • anonymous
need to study some portion of physics(current, magnetism, concept of electronic components ), maths for sure. some portion of chemistry(kind of electrolytic cell and others...basics of chem..like balancing eqn's )
anonymous
  • anonymous
Well if u didnt study that dosnt mean anything. Well what u wanna do right now meas everything. To know much about electronics, you need to start from basic electronics. Like electricity, potential differences, current, resistance, diodes, transistors, transformers, capacitors in this way. If you concentrate with adequate interest, then u will be fine with electronics. But for electrical you might have to spend much more, coz the components will become huge. Most of the time people go into electronics than electrical. Electrical Engg, deals with the grid, distribution, ac current supply, huge transformers. The voltage range will be from 110 to 10000 or more as well as the current will be more than 15 Amps. Surely as far as I know electronics also deals in high current. If you have aimed at being Electrical engg then you should try it.

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