anonymous
  • anonymous
Can someone tell me if I'm correct? VERY MUCH APPRECIATED (-1)(x^2) - 3/2x^69 - square root of 2.4 IS a polynomial. 1(x^2) - 3x^69/2 IS a polynomial. (-1)(x^2) - 3x^68 - square root of 2.4(x) IS a polynomial. 1(x^2) - 3x^69 - square root of x IS a polynomial. 1(x^2) - 3x^-96 IS NOT a polynomial.
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
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amistre64
  • amistre64
give your reasoning ....
amistre64
  • amistre64
or, how would you define a polynomial?
anonymous
  • anonymous
To be honest I was guessing. I know polynomials can't have a negative exponent or a variable as a denominator ?

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amistre64
  • amistre64
good, they also cant have anyting like square roots and such of a variable .... if memory serves, the coefficients are not restricted tho, or are they?
amistre64
  • amistre64
and for "square root of", just type sqrt(x) its more readily understood
amistre64
  • amistre64
(-1)(x^2) - 3/2x^69 - sqrt(2.4) ^ ^ is this under the fraction? 1(x^2) - 3x^69/2 ^ ^ good (-1)(x^2) - 3x^68 - square root of 2.4(x) is this sqrt(2.4x) ? or, x sqrt(2.4)? 1(x^2) - 3x^69 - sqrt(x) ^^ trouble 1(x^2) - 3x^-96 ^^ trouble
amistre64
  • amistre64
hopefully that second one isnt x^(69/2)
anonymous
  • anonymous
the ^69 is over the 3/2
anonymous
  • anonymous
it's 2.4 times x
amistre64
  • amistre64
\[\frac32x^{69} \text{ is a good term then}\]
amistre64
  • amistre64
the the x is getting sqrted, then theres trouble
amistre64
  • amistre64
*if the x is getting ..
anonymous
  • anonymous
so the first on IS a polynomial?
amistre64
  • amistre64
if ive read your post correctly, then the first one looks fine
anonymous
  • anonymous
Here, can I take a screen shot of the question and attach it? would that be easier?
amistre64
  • amistre64
that would be fine
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ok give me a minute please and thank you :D
anonymous
  • anonymous
1 Attachment
amistre64
  • amistre64
much better :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
I figured as much
amistre64
  • amistre64
now, from the information ive already stated; can you tell me (by number) which ones you beleieve to be polys?
anonymous
  • anonymous
1, 2, and 4 I believe
amistre64
  • amistre64
spose by letter is fine .... dint see them there for some reason :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
maybe 3
amistre64
  • amistre64
does 2 have a fraction as an exponent on the x?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes.
amistre64
  • amistre64
does 69/2 simplify to an integer?
anonymous
  • anonymous
So it isn't a poly
anonymous
  • anonymous
69 is like 34. something ?
amistre64
  • amistre64
then its not an integer result and is bad for poly definitions
anonymous
  • anonymous
so b is NOT a poly
amistre64
  • amistre64
b is NOT a poly
amistre64
  • amistre64
... too many options for D, can a poly have a sqrt(x) in it?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
? I think lol
amistre64
  • amistre64
\[\Large\sqrt x =x^{1/2}\] can we have exponents that are not integers?
amistre64
  • amistre64
just remember that if x has anything other than an exponent and a coefficient acting on it, its bad news
amistre64
  • amistre64
sin(x) is bad news ln(x) is bad news e^(x) is bad news sqrt(x) is bad news if the exponents is not a positive integer, ... its bad news as well
amistre64
  • amistre64
from this, I can only see 2 options that are polynomials by definition
amistre64
  • amistre64
\[(-1)\cdot x^2-\frac32x^{69}-\sqrt{2.4}~;~good \] \[1\cdot x^2-3\cancel {x^{69/2}}\] \[(-1)\cdot x^2-3 {x^{68}}-\sqrt{2.4}\cdot x~:~good\] \[1\cdot x^2-3 {x^{69}}-\cancel{\sqrt{x}}\] \[1\cdot x^2-3 \cancel{{x^{-69}}}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
So is it A and D?
amistre64
  • amistre64
uh, no. its A and C ... barring any typos that is
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ohh ok. Well thank you you've really helped a lot
amistre64
  • amistre64
youre welcome, and good luck :)

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