anonymous
  • anonymous
At what height does a 1000-kg mass have a potential energy of 1 J relative to the ground? Show your work.
Physics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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raffle_snaffle
  • raffle_snaffle
Are we trying to find the gravitational work on the 1000kg mass?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Tbh I have no idea whatsoever >.< lol
anonymous
  • anonymous
Potential Energy is:\[E_p=m·g·h \rightarrow h=\frac{ E_p }{ m·g }=\frac{ 1 }{ 1000·9.81 }=0.0001m\]and 0.0001m=0.1 mm

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anonymous
  • anonymous
I don't understand what I'm supposed to plug into that eaquation
Festinger
  • Festinger
It really depends on how you want to calculate it. For most cases we use newton's law of universal attraction to calculate the work, but in this case Gravitational Energy = mass * gravitational constant * height will do. This question wants us to find height. We have mass = 1000kg, E = 1J, and g = 9.81m/s^2, since we are dealing with on earth. Putting it all together should give you the solution stated by CarlosGP
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[1_{p} = 1000kg \times 9.81m \div s ^{2} \times h \rightarrow h = \frac{ 1 _{p} }{1000kg \times 9.81m/s ^{2} }\] Is that even close to a start
Festinger
  • Festinger
Yes, but there is no subscript p, but there should the the unit of Joule, which is actually: kg (m/s)^2, putting it all together h has the unit of m as expected.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Can I please see the correct order please? I'm slightly confused with the second part of what you just said.
Festinger
  • Festinger
Maybe in a few days, I tried typing it out in TeX twice but it crashed, taking everything I typed with it.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay then... thank you for trying T:
anonymous
  • anonymous
@AngelCriner Go back to the formula I wrote: Ep=Potential Energy in Joules h=height in meters m=mass in Kilograms g=9.81 m/sec^2
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[1J=1000kg \times 9.81m/\sec^2 \times ? \rightarrow ? = \frac{ 1J }{ 1000 \times 9.81 } = \frac{ 1}{ 1000 \times 9.81 } = 0.0001m\] I am extremely lost
anonymous
  • anonymous
? = h = height in meters
anonymous
  • anonymous
I didn't know where the height came from though so I didn't have a number to plug in >.<
Festinger
  • Festinger
Work is force x distance, and the unit is joule (energy) force is mass x acceleration, and unit is newton (force) acceleration has units of m/s^2 square brackets means units of: \[ [Energy] = J = [Force]*[Distance] = [mass]*[accleration]*[dist] = kg * m / s^2 * m\] which simplifies to: \[ J = kg * m^2/s^2\] Substituting this J into the original expression you get height in units of meters, as it should be.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Read the problem and note that height is precisely the unknown you need to calculate
anonymous
  • anonymous
Oh.My.Goodness. >_\ Oh...my...GOODNESS. I'm so sorry >.< I'm failing to understand the correlation between the problem and the expression. /:

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