anonymous
  • anonymous
transfer momentum
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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chestercat
  • chestercat
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anonymous
  • anonymous
a car is travelling at a constant speed in a circle with radius 100 m
anonymous
  • anonymous
drawing is not quite clear, could you please draw it again? :P
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1378457063394:dw| those are 2 degree

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay, let's take a look... do we also have a measure for this angle: The angle between r1 and r2?
anonymous
  • anonymous
ya it is 2 degree too... between r1 and r2, r2 and r3, r4 and r5, and r5 and r6 those are all 2 degree
anonymous
  • anonymous
Alright, thanks.
anonymous
  • anonymous
it looks like first we'll need to find the speed of the car going around the circle, by using the equation relating speed, time and distance:
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1378457917828:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
100 m / 0.6
anonymous
  • anonymous
We were given the time to get from r1 to r3... and can also find the distance along the circle between those points, since we were given the circle's radius. But before we can get the distance between the r1 and r3, we'll need the distance around the whole circle (its circumference) Do you remember the formula for circumference?
anonymous
  • anonymous
2 pi r
anonymous
  • anonymous
circumference = 628
anonymous
  • anonymous
its involved a little more than that, for the distance we need to do more calculations.
anonymous
  • anonymous
like...?
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1378458211749:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
(628*2)/360 = distance between r1 and r2 = 3.49
anonymous
  • anonymous
then, we see that between each two points marked along the circle, that takes up exactly 1/12th of the whole circumference. Since the points are separated by equal angles...
anonymous
  • anonymous
hmm, are we sure the angles aren't marked as a symbol like: rather than 2 that would make a little more sense based on the picture
anonymous
  • anonymous
sorry but distance between 2 points is 4 degree (r1 to r3) which is 1/90 not 1/12
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1378458471545:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
if it really is 2, then what you have is correct.
anonymous
  • anonymous
ya it is 2
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay, yes if those really are just 2 degrees each I was interpreting it a little differently, but it's difficult to say without seeing the exact problem statement.
anonymous
  • anonymous
:P
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1378458681252:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
3.49
anonymous
  • anonymous
thats the exact problem statement i wrote and the exact same figure
anonymous
  • anonymous
If those really are 2 degrees, then the distance between r1 and r3 would be given by 628*4/360, similar to what you wrote.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Now we can plug in this distance and time into the formula speed
anonymous
  • anonymous
yep can u go ahead and solve it please so if i have question i can ask later
anonymous
  • anonymous
So plugging in d= 3.49 and t=.6, we get s=3.49/.6 Could you tell me what that equals?
anonymous
  • anonymous
wait that is for 2 degree, for 4 degree it is 6.9
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay, thanks for checking
anonymous
  • anonymous
np...hey i havee real short time to solve that question like 30 minutes....can you do it asap
anonymous
  • anonymous
Alright, so that gives a speed around the circle 11.5 m/2 at point r2, the car is moving straight up since that's the point where it crosses the axis...
anonymous
  • anonymous
so what are the components
anonymous
  • anonymous
So at that point, the car's horizontal velocity is 0 and the vertical velocity is the full of 11.5 m/s
anonymous
  • anonymous
yep at r2 right
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1378459259658:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
I've circled it on that board
anonymous
  • anonymous
''components'' just means the horizontal and vertical velocities written separately
anonymous
  • anonymous
and yes you're right! :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Any other questions about this problem?
anonymous
  • anonymous
z componenet at r2?
anonymous
  • anonymous
0... since the car is travelling in a flat circle, it only has x and y components.
anonymous
  • anonymous
all done?
anonymous
  • anonymous
nope lol 3 more question if u dont mind
anonymous
  • anonymous
0.6 seconds pass between t_4 when car is at r_4 and t_6 when car is at r_6 determine x,y,z components of car's velocity vector when it is near r_5
anonymous
  • anonymous
Not right now, but maybe later. Good luck with your studies!
anonymous
  • anonymous
ty
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm tired, sorry. lol :/
anonymous
  • anonymous
np
anonymous
  • anonymous
thx for explaining stuff
anonymous
  • anonymous
no worries, my pleasure. :P

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