anonymous
  • anonymous
Water is :- Acidic Basic Neutral
Chemistry
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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anonymous
  • anonymous
You need to get away from the simplistic idea that, because the pH of water is 7, it is "neutral." It isn't. Water has 2 lone pairs of electrons on the oxygen, one of which can be donated to a suitable acceptor. Water is therefore a Lewis base. Water also contains hydrogens, which under suitable conditions can be donated as protons. Therefore, water is a potential Bronsted-Lowry acid. In many environments, it will act as neither. But in the right environment, with suitable reagents, it can act as either...
anonymous
  • anonymous
was this helpful?
anonymous
  • anonymous
still confused :(

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anonymous
  • anonymous
pure water donates H+ so it should be acidic??
anonymous
  • anonymous
@ⒶArchie☁✪ ??
anonymous
  • anonymous
sorry.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Water is the reference substance for pH
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1378462505325:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
So basically pure water is taken as a pH reference because it's neutral, it has a pH= 7
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1378462616906:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
so if the pH is greater than 7 we say it's basic, and if it's lower than 7 we say a substance in acidic but pure water will have a neutral pH which is 7. Does this problem make sense to you now? xP
anonymous
  • anonymous
@KhiZ
anonymous
  • anonymous
i know this ... but today my teacher told me that itx acidic...
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok water is neutral because it's the reference for the pH (pH=7 means it's neutral) what happens here is that water can be and acid you can see it releases H+ ions.
anonymous
  • anonymous
so itx acidic??
anonymous
  • anonymous
an acid is a substance that releases H+ ions
anonymous
  • anonymous
but the amount of H= ions it releases gives a neutral pH We have 2 things here 1. the pH since pH of water is 7 we know it's neutral but the definition of an acidic substance is an substance that releases H+ ions, so you can see water releases H+ ions
anonymous
  • anonymous
water is considered an acid and a base (releases OH- ions too) but that definition comes from ionization, releasing H+ and OH- is this part clear to you now?
aaronq
  • aaronq
Which part you confused with? water acting as a Bronsted acid, or water being an acidic solution (in terms of pH)?
abb0t
  • abb0t
Water can act as both a base or acid. Pure water however, has a pH of 7 (neutral)
theEric
  • theEric
I think, if I remember way back, this stuff seems a little familiar. It can be considered acidic or basic because it does react with other water to make \(\sf H^+\) and \(\sf OH^-\) molecules. And the rest is water. But there is a mix of \(\sf H_2O\), \(\sf H^+\) and \(\sf OH^-\) molecules in your solution. Water molecules react such that those are products. I haven't verified this personally, but I will repeat @ⒶArchie☁✪: \(\qquad\qquad \sf H_2O \ \huge^{\rightharpoonup}_{\leftharpoondown}\normalsize H^+ + OH^-\) Overall, in pure water, there will be just as much \(\sf H^+\) as \(\sf OH^-\). Since it has a slight \(\sf H^+\) concentration, it has a pH slightly greater than 7 - if you ignore the base part, it is slightly acidic. I guess that, on a similar scale, one measures based on base concentration ignoring acid concentration, you might look at water on the scale as a base. There are different definitions used by different scientists, and I don't understand them all. But really water is just as basic as acidic, and it's hardly either! I think a rise in thermal energy encourages a higher concentration of the acids and bases. Water is the more structurally sound molecule, I believe. And that would mean that low thermal energy would cause the solution to be more affected by electrostatic forces making the water the way it'll go. And, with more thermal energy, the individual pieces of water can gain more energy that that which keeps them together. Then they will separate. Probably smash into each other or others to make water again - and that will be a cycle.. Hence the double arrows! But I wouldn't trust me on that if I were you - I'd seek validation. I hope this cleared up any doubts you have!

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