anonymous
  • anonymous
What is the resonant frequency of a 10-mH inductor and a 0.005-uF capacitor? They showed me how they got their answer (1/6.28(sq rt of LC) ) but when I do it I don't get their exact answer which is 22,500Hz or 22.5kHz
Physics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
fr=(1/6.28(sq rt of LC) )
anonymous
  • anonymous
have you got 22519,3 Hz ?
radar
  • radar
|dw:1378512753172:dw|

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radar
  • radar
How far off was your results, How far out did you used for Pi?
anonymous
  • anonymous
They had it setup like this... \[1\div6.28\sqrt{10\times10^{-3}}\times0.005\times 10^{-6}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
what steps should i do first when doing this problem maybe that's why i'm not getting the answer
anonymous
  • anonymous
First of all you should do inside of square root and then times it with 6,28 then you get a value. Last of all you should do division part.
anonymous
  • anonymous
look at units...convert in SI first..
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm still not getting the right answer at all :-/ @radar or @oksuz_ if you could show me what you did step-by-step i'd really appreciate it btw i'm using the computer calculator if that makes a difference
anonymous
  • anonymous
1 Attachment
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ok but why was 1 replaced by 10^6 ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
because there is 10^-6 in the denominator. when it goes up, it turns 10^6
radar
  • radar
I believe oksuz link to his jpg clearly shows the steps necessary, actually I though my drawing did also, but I did leave out some arithmetic steps.|dw:1378564212841:dw|I believe your difficulty is in the handling of very large or very small numbers which occur all the time in electronics. (Megawatts, to pico-farads, terrabytes etc.)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ok i'm understanding a little better now. So if this was an actual question and my answer was 22519 Hz and theirs was 22500 Hz it would be right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
i think it would be true.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Alright i'm about to do a problem exactly like this one but i won't know the answer so if you could confirm my answer by saying yes it's right or no it's wrong, that would be nice i can't afford to get this wrong
anonymous
  • anonymous
i do my best.
anonymous
  • anonymous
A tank circuit uses a 0.09 uH inductor and a 0.4-uF capacitor. What would the resonat frequency be? I got 839.2 Hz
anonymous
  • anonymous
actually the result is true except unit. Check your math.
anonymous
  • anonymous
839.24 KHz ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes it is.
anonymous
  • anonymous
thanks for all the help @oksuz_ @radar !
radar
  • radar
The use of "scientific notation" makes working with large and small numbers easier.

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