karatechopper
  • karatechopper
If saturated fats have only one bond with carbon, does that mean that they are represented as amine groups? And does that then mean that unsaturated fats are represented as carboxyl groups?
Biology
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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chestercat
  • chestercat
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Frostbite
  • Frostbite
I'm not sure I understand your question care to elaborate? Especially how you want amine groups into the picture about fats.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm really confused, but saturated fats have no carbon-carbon double bonds (they are saturated with hydrogen), but unsaturated fats have one to three double bonds along the backbone carbon chain. http://telstar.ote.cmu.edu/biology/MembranePage/index2.html This website has some really helpful diagrams. My initial response is to say they fit in neither
karatechopper
  • karatechopper
ok so forget about what it is bonded with lol. Uhm I mean like Saturated fats only have one bond so does that put them into the Amine group? And Unsaturated fats have double bonds so does that put them into the carboxyl group?

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Frostbite
  • Frostbite
It is as sarah suggest. That if we work with saturated fatty acids it is simple a carboxylic acid with a alkane chain. However if unsaturated we remove hydrogen under the formation of a double bond. An example of a saturated fatty acids could be stearic acid (octadecan acid) with the structure seen in attachment. An example of an unsaturated fatty acid could be linoleic acid ((9Z,12Z)-octadeca-9,12-dienoic acid) that is a divalent unsaturated fatty acid.
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karatechopper
  • karatechopper
oh ok, thanks!
Frostbite
  • Frostbite
No problem, if any doubt or thinking about something else let us know! :)
Frostbite
  • Frostbite
I used the word divalent... please remove that ;) wrong in this context... better to call it a polyunsaturated fatty acid.
abb0t
  • abb0t
A fatty acid is R-COOH. It has no amino group.

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