anonymous
  • anonymous
Show all work in simplifying the quantity of three x squared minus three x minus sixty, divided by the quantity of x squared plus nine x plus twenty Be sure to list restrictions.
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
katieb
  • katieb
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[3x^2-3x-60 \over x^2+9x+20\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
factorise both the top nd the bottom differently nd they shouls cancel out
anonymous
  • anonymous
that's what I am working on so far I have \[(3x+ )(x-) \over (x+4)(x+5)\]

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
write down the factors of 60
anonymous
  • anonymous
1*60, 2*30, 3*20, 4*15, 5*12, & 6*10
anonymous
  • anonymous
have you tried inputting all the factors?? if it doesnt work devide across the top half only by 3 that gives u X squared -minus X minus 20 which will be much easier to work with
anonymous
  • anonymous
answer for top is (x+4)(x-5)
campbell_st
  • campbell_st
with your factorisation of the numerator take out 3 as a common factor 1st \[\frac{3(x^2 - x - 20)}{x^2 + 9x + 20}\] now factor the quadratics.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@campbell would it be the same as deviding across top half by 3?
campbell_st
  • campbell_st
no.... because of you are simplifying an expression.... if you divide the numerator by 3 you would also have to divide the denominator by 3 the 3 will play a roll in the final answer
anonymous
  • anonymous
thank you very much for explaining that to me im a bit rusty with my maths since the summer holidays :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok, so then what happens after it becomes \[3(x^2-x-20) \over (x+4)(x+5)\] ?
campbell_st
  • campbell_st
for the numerator find the factors of -20 that add to -5, the larger factor is negative and the smaller is positive.
anonymous
  • anonymous
that will be 4 and 5
campbell_st
  • campbell_st
which is negative and which is positive..?
anonymous
  • anonymous
5 is negative 4 is positive
campbell_st
  • campbell_st
ok so now it looks like \[\frac{3(x +4)(x -5)}{(x +4)(x +5)}\] so next you need to look at restrictions before simplifying
anonymous
  • anonymous
if I am not mistaken as they r multiplied by each other the (x+4) at the top and bottom should cancel each other
campbell_st
  • campbell_st
they do cancel but there is a restriction.... a point of discontinuity at x = -4 and there is a vertical asymptote at the other restiction.
anonymous
  • anonymous
is one of the restrictions \[\neq-5\] ?
campbell_st
  • campbell_st
thats correct... well done
anonymous
  • anonymous
is there only one restriction?
campbell_st
  • campbell_st
there is a horizontal restriction.... y = 3
anonymous
  • anonymous
hmm I dont understand this restrictions stuff nd asymptotes btw what level maths is this??
anonymous
  • anonymous
algebra 2
anonymous
  • anonymous
hmm not sure im familiar with that hope u dont mind me tagging along and learning too from campbell
anonymous
  • anonymous
so now you cancel out the x+4 ...... \[3(x-5) \over (x-5) \] with \[\neq-5 \] and \[\neq3\] now what do you do?
campbell_st
  • campbell_st
after cancelling you get \[\frac{3(x -5)}{x + 5}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
oops sorry i mixed up the signs for the bottom one
campbell_st
  • campbell_st
so the restictions.... vertical asymptotes \[x \ne -4, -5\] horizontal asymptote \[y \ne 3\]

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.