I know this is not math but whatever. If the mass is 1.16 and the volume is 8.5 what is the slope?

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I know this is not math but whatever. If the mass is 1.16 and the volume is 8.5 what is the slope?

Mathematics
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In my HW it says to find the slope it's (change in mass)/(change in volume)
@Luigi0210 help please?
Do you know the changes?

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What do you mean by that?
Do you only have one set of values?
Oh no there's more. Want me to put them up?
Label 1) mass: 1.16 g volume:8.5 . Label 2) mass:0.98 volume: 7.2. Label 3) mass: 1.13 volume:10.0 . Label 4) mass: 0.69 volume: 6.2. Label 5) mass: 0.83 volume:6.0. Label 6) mass:1.45 volume: 12.9. Label 7) mass: 0.88 volume: 7.9. Label 8) mass: 1.03 volume: 7.5. Label 9) mass: 0.74 volume: 5.4. Label 10) mass: 1.02 volume: 7.5
Sorry I couldn't lined them up well I'm on my iPad right now
Uhm
Yeah?
I got nothing, sorry
what happens if you treat the mass as the x coordinate and the volume as the y coordinate?
But that'll mean graphing all 10 of them
ya working on ti
@dumbcow @dan815 got any ideas how to do this?
@Luigi0210 don't worry(:
tryin to find a website the will plot all the points
Okay thanks
kant, use this site, it's quite good :) https://www.desmos.com/calculator
looks like the slopes are about the same for a series of points...not sure what the question is looking for
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thanks zepdrix i'll check that site too...the one i found called http://openstudy.com/study#
I'm missing clone wars for this!
@kantalope lol my bad and how does this help me find what I'm looking for?
typically when you are looking for slope you are looking for the change in whatever based on the change in the other thing.....these changes aren't a straight line. what else does the question have?
it is a bit confusing that a slope can be asked when mass and volume are given. However, if the slope is meant to mean density, then I will say the slope= mass/volume.
if the data has a function we can find the variable slope based on the derivative of the function
heh - I'll bet I'm supposed to be able to figure out this kind of problem at the end of the semester not the beginning...and the martini I just finished in not helping...
I'm rearranging the data on the graph...
http://mcpchemistry1.wikispaces.com/file/view/HW4%20-%20Density%20Graph%20Practice%202013-14.doc/447730728/HW4%20-%20Density%20Graph%20Practice%202013-14.doc here is my HW, the question is on the last page
The points are all squirrely so a serious person would do some stat regression to find the mean
Ah ha...which is exactly what the graph was finding
I think your looking at the wrong page, it's the very last one
right so my pictures were plots of the data that we were given...it is all wonky
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If we were measuring stuff that had a consistent mass to volume ratio the line would be nice and straight....the more stuff we had the more it would weigh yea?
Yeah it is all "wonky" ughhh this is irritating
that's ok that is how real data works
Yeah, I know what your saying
You sure I'm not just suppose to divide or subtract?
so our data is sloppy could mean a couple of things like the hint suggests - maybe some of the chunks we are looking at are real rocks and some are plastic fake rocks
Their metals
nah if you were serious about this data you would plot it out like we did and look if it was in straight lines...if it was not you would do a process called regression to find the average slope between the plot points
right so some of metal is real and some of it isn't or some of the metal is a different kind or you could just be kinda sloppy in measuring the volume or the mass...rounding up sometimes and rounding down others or if you have different people doing the measuring the data will get screwy
Becauseatfirst I taught I was only suppose to divide and ill get the answer, but apparerently not
So for the last page you can paste in the plots in the pictures and a hypothesis is that the measurements are not consistent and that there seems to be two different trend lines in the data so there are probably two different kinds of metal in the sample with two densities regression wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Least_squares
If you did just divide each set of points to get a series of numbers....I'll bet you get two sets of answers...lemme check that
Okay(:
actually turns out that there are more like 3 sets of ratios - .14 is the answer to 3 samples .111 to three and .138 to three more <-- this also points to something funny with the data if the ration of volume to mass was the same all the samples would have basically the same well ratio ya ----so just dividing would show something but the graph makes it easier to see
Can you explain in a different way, she cant understand
If the samples were consistent - all made of the same stuff - if you had more stuff it would weigh more....a big gold coin has more mass (weighs more) than a small gold coin...and that change in size and mass would be consistent. A coin that is twice as big would weigh twice as much....does that make sense?
Yes, I do understand that thAt was one of the questions lol
so if i started handing you coins that were twice as big but didn't weigh twice as much ...you would say "dood, you are rippin me off, these are not gold coins" that is what the first graph is showing ....there are four coins in the top line with a certain volume to weight ratio (slope) and then 6 coins in another line with a different volume to weight ratio(slope)
Somehow I think I'm just suppose to divide, and I'm just complicating myself!
well number 2 on the second to last page says graph it....so there is that
Yeah and I already graphed it
and the graph show some dots that make a line and some other dots that make a different line?
Yeah they do
so the last question says to calculate the slope of each of those lines m= (y1-y0) / (x1-x0) if you pick any two points on the two lines you can get the slope
Can you do the first one as an example? Please
ok top line the first point is (.69, 6.2) and another point on that line looks like (1.45, 12.9) would you agree?
y1= 12.9 y0 = 6.2 x1= 1.45 x0 = .69 6.7/.76 = 8.82
No it's suppose to be 1.16 and 8.5
the points on the other line are (0.74,5.4), ( 0.83,6.0), ( 0.98, 7.2), ( 1.02 ,7.5), ( 1.03, 7.5), (1.16,8.5) you can use any of those points to calculate the slope of the second line
I started with the top line....that point is on the lower line...you can go with whatever one first
So I'll divide it like 1.16/8.5 correct?
not if you want to calculate the slope like the last question asks...dividing will just get you the ratio not the slope...
I made the graph bigger so it is easier to see the two different lines....we are looking for the slope of those two lines I think that the instructions are confusing as they ask for the change in mass over the change in volume....simply dividing is not the change....it is just the mass over the volume...in order to get the change part you have to do the y1-y0 thing
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I hope that means you are going ...ah, I get it rather than ah @$%$ it =)
Ahhhh crap? Lol I think I'm complicating it more that I should that's why , but that's all
k gl im out its really late here
Yeah get some sleep goodnight

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